English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Where the depressed mind wanders: Self-generated thought patterns as assessed trough experience sampling as a state marker of depression

Hoffmann, F., Banzhaf, C., Kanske, P., Bermpohl, F., & Singer, T. (2016). Where the depressed mind wanders: Self-generated thought patterns as assessed trough experience sampling as a state marker of depression. Journal of Affective Disorders, 198, 127-134. doi:10.1016/j.jad.2016.03.005.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-D67A-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1BB3-5
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Hoffmann, Ferdinand1, Author              
Banzhaf, Christian2, Author
Kanske, Philipp1, Author              
Bermpohl, Felix2, Author
Singer, Tania1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
2Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Depression; Mind wandering; Experience sampling; Self-generated thought; State marker
 Abstract: Background Self-generated thoughts (SGTs), such as during mind-wandering, occupy much of our waking life. Individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) are less in the “here and now” and prone to rumination. Few studies have looked at SGTs in depression using experience sampling methods and no study has so far investigated the specific contents of depressive SGTs and how they vary from one time point to another. Methods MDD patients (n=25) and matched healthy controls (n=26) performed an established mind wandering task, involving non-demanding number discriminations. Intermittent probe questions ask for participants’ current SGTs, that is, how off-task the thoughts are, how positive or negative, self- or other-related, and past- or future-oriented. Results Multi-level modeling revealed that MDD patients engaged in more mind wandering than healthy controls. Their SGTs were predominantly negative and less positive, more self-related and past-oriented. Strongest predictor of depressive SGT was the decreased positive valence of thoughts. MDD patients’ future and past-oriented thoughts were particularly more negative compared to healthy controls. Within MDD patients, the less positively valenced thoughts they had and the less variable these thoughts were, the more depressive symptoms they showed. Limitation No other measures of rumination and worry were used. Conclusion MDD patients show a very specific SGT pattern, possibly reflecting ruminative and anxious thoughts. This SGT pattern in depression might represent a useful state marker and even constitute an etiological factor of this debilitating disease, considering the importance of current SGT on and individual's cognitive processes and affective states.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-02-282015-12-092016-03-052016-03-082016-07-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.03.005
PMID: 27015160
Other: Epub 2016
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Journal of Affective Disorders
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 198 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 127 - 134 Identifier: ISSN: 0165-0327
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925480595