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  Evidence for hydrodynamic electron flow in PdCoO2

Moll, P. J. W., Kushwaha, P., Nandi, N., Schmidt, B., & Mackenzie, A. P. (2016). Evidence for hydrodynamic electron flow in PdCoO2. Science Magazine, 351(6277), 1061-1064. doi:10.1126/science.aac8385.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-04E0-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-CDEE-F
Genre: Journal Article

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Moll, Philip J. W.1, Author              
Kushwaha, Pallavi2, Author              
Nandi, Nabhanila3, Author              
Schmidt, Burkhard4, Author              
Mackenzie, Andrew P.5, Author              
Affiliations:
1Physics of Microstructured Quantum Matter, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society, ou_2466701              
2Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society, ou_1863404              
3Physics of Quantum Materials, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society, ou_1863462              
4Burkhard Schmidt, Physics of Quantum Materials, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society, ou_1863464              
5Andrew Mackenzie, Physics of Quantum Materials, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society, ou_1863463              

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 Abstract: Electrons inside a conductor are often described as flowing in response to an electric field. This flow rarely resembles anything like the familiar flow of water through a pipe, but three groups describe counterexamples (see the Perspective by Zaanen). Moll et al. found that the viscosity of the electron fluid in thin wires of PdCoO2 had a major effect on the flow, much like what happens in regular fluids. Bandurin et al. found evidence in graphene of electron whirlpools similar to those formed by viscous fluid flowing through a small opening. Finally, Crossno et al. observed a huge increase of thermal transport in graphene, a signature of so-called Dirac fluids.Science, this issue p. 1061, 1055, 1058; see also p. 1026Electron transport is conventionally determined by the momentum-relaxing scattering of electrons by the host solid and its excitations. Hydrodynamic fluid flow through channels, in contrast, is determined partly by the viscosity of the fluid, which is governed by momentum-conserving internal collisions. A long-standing question in the physics of solids has been whether the viscosity of the electron fluid plays an observable role in determining the resistance. We report experimental evidence that the resistance of restricted channels of the ultrapure two-dimensional metal palladium cobaltate (PdCoO2) has a large viscous contribution. Comparison with theory allows an estimate of the electronic viscosity in the range between 6 ̑exttimes} 10{–}3 kg m{–}1 s{–}1 and 3 {̑exttimes} 10{–}4 kg m{–}1 s{–}1, versus 1 {̑exttimes} 10{–}3 kg m{–}1 s{–1 for water at room temperature.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-02-112016-03-16
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1126/science.aac8385
BibTex Citekey: Moll1061
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Title: Science Magazine
  Other : Science
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Washington, D.C. : American Association for the Advancement of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 351 (6277) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1061 - 1064 Identifier: ISSN: 0036-8075
CoNE: /journals/resource/991042748276600