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  Introducing the Wunderkammer as a tool for emotion research: Unconstrained gaze and movement patterns in three emotionally evocative virtual worlds

McCall, C., Hildebrandt, L. K., Hartmann, R., Baczkowski, B., & Singer, T. (2016). Introducing the Wunderkammer as a tool for emotion research: Unconstrained gaze and movement patterns in three emotionally evocative virtual worlds. Computers in Human Behavior, 59, 93-107. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2016.01.028.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-16F7-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-9969-C
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
McCall, Cade1, Author              
Hildebrandt, Lea K.1, Author              
Hartmann , Ralf1, Author
Baczkowski, Blazej2, 3, Author              
Singer, Tania1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
2Max Planck Research Group Neuroanatomy and Connectivity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356546              
3Institute of Psychology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poland, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Virtual reality; Threat; Affect; Emotion; Emotion regulation; Behavioral methods
 Abstract: Here we introduce the “Wunderkammer”, a suite of immersive virtual worlds with different types of emotionally-charged content. We use these worlds to examine the effects of affective context on unconstrained gaze and movement. In the Affect Gallery, participants freely explored a virtual art museum filled with objects that varied in valence and arousal. Participants approached and gazed more at positively valenced objects. This preference was amplified by more arousing objects and was strongest among individuals with resilient emotion regulation tendencies. This bias of avoiding negative valence did not emerge in The Crowded Room, an environment in which participants encountered virtual humans expressing different emotions. Instead, participants gazed more at negative than neutral emotional displays although they physically avoided angry (but not sad or neutral) agents. When placed inside Room 101, an unpredictable environment filled with a series of disturbing events, frightened participants became relatively immobile in terms of both gaze and movement. This freezing-type response was particularly strong among dispositionally resilient individuals. Together these results demonstrate that distinct affective contexts elicit unique patterns in unconstrained gaze and movement. They further illustrate the benefits of using virtual reality to study affect as it naturally emerges.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-01-202015-10-012016-01-222016-02-062016-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2016.01.028
 Degree: -

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Title: Computers in Human Behavior
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York, NY, USA : Pergamon
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 59 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 93 - 107 Identifier: ISSN: 0747-5632
CoNE: /journals/resource/0747-5632