English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Voice identity processing in autism spectrum disorder

Schelinski, S., Roswandowitz, C., & von Kriegstein, K. (2017). Voice identity processing in autism spectrum disorder. Autism Research, 10(1), 155-168. doi:10.1002/aur.1639.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-3713-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-BB37-D
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Schelinski, Stefanie1, Author              
Roswandowitz, Claudia1, 2, Author              
von Kriegstein, Katharina1, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              
2International Max Planck Research School on Neuroscience of Communication, ou_persistent22              
3Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Autism spectrum disorder; Voice recognition; Pitch discrimination; Famous voice recognition; Timbre discrimination; Face recognition; Superior temporal sulcus
 Abstract: People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have difficulties in identifying another person by face and voice. This might contribute considerably to the development of social cognition and interaction difficulties. The characteristics of the voice recognition deficit in ASD are unknown. Here, we used a comprehensive behavioral test battery to systematically investigate voice processing in high-functioning ASD (n = 16) and typically developed pair-wise matched controls (n = 16). The ASD group had particular difficulties with discriminating, learning, and recognizing unfamiliar voices, while recognizing famous voices was relatively intact. Tests on acoustic processing abilities showed that the ASD group had a specific deficit in vocal pitch perception that was dissociable from otherwise intact acoustic processing (i.e., musical pitch, musical, and vocal timbre perception). Our results allow a characterization of the voice recognition deficit in ASD: The findings indicate that in high-functioning ASD, the difficulty to recognize voices is particularly pronounced for learning novel voices and the recognition of unfamiliar peoples' voices. This pattern might be indicative of difficulties with integrating the acoustic characteristics of the voice into a coherent percept—a function that has been previously associated with voice-selective regions in the posterior superior temporal sulcus/gyrus of the human brain.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-04-012015-12-172016-04-042016-07-122017-01-27
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/aur.1639
PMID: 27404447
Other: Epub 2016
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show hide
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : Max Planck Research Group Grant
Funding organization : Max Planck Society

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Autism Research
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Hoboken, NJ, USA : Wiley
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 155 - 168 Identifier: ISSN: 1939-3792
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1939-3792