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  Anxiety alters visual guidance of braking over time

Geuss, M., Ruginski, I., & Stefanucci, J. (2015). Anxiety alters visual guidance of braking over time. In H. H. Bülthoff, A. Kemeny, & P. Pretto (Eds.), DSC 2015 Europe: Driving Simulation Conference & Exhibition (pp. 241-242). Tübingen, Germany: Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-44B4-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-811C-F
Genre: Conference Paper

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http://dsc2015.tuebingen.mpg.de/Program.html (Publisher version)
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 Creators:
Geuss, M1, Author              
Ruginski, IT, Author
Stefanucci, JK1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              

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 Abstract: Previous research suggests that drivers use specific visual information to execute braking behaviors [Faj05] and that drivers calibrate braking behavior to this visual information over time [Faj09]. Specifically, Fajen (2005) argued that when successfully braking, participants adjust braking pressure to maintain a visually-specified ideal braking pressure less than one’s maximum ability to brake. In the current paper, we investigated whether factors, specifically one’s emotional state, would alter the relationship between braking behavior and visually-specified ideal braking pressure over time. Specifically, we investigated whether the performance of braking changed when anxious. Previous research demonstrated that anxiety influences static perceptual judgments of space [Gra12] and the performance of open-loop sports actions [Bei10]. Open-loop actions are actions where once the movement has been initiated there are no opportunities to alter the outcome (i.e., putting a golf ball). This research shows an influence of anxiety on static perceptual tasks and the performance of open-loop actions suggesting that anxiety may also influence more complex everyday actions like braking. It is important to know whether, and how, the influence of anxiety extends to the performance of closedloop actions like braking given the potential realworld consequences of poor performance.

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 Dates: 2015-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: GeussRS2015
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Title: DSC 2015 Europe: Driving Simulation Conference Exhibition
Place of Event: Tübingen, Germany
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Title: DSC 2015 Europe: Driving Simulation Conference & Exhibition
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Bülthoff, Heinrich H1, Editor            
Kemeny, A., Editor
Pretto, Paolo1, Editor            
Affiliations:
1 Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797            
Publ. Info: Tübingen, Germany : Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 241 - 242 Identifier: ISBN: 978-3-9813099-3-5