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  Self-Identification With Another’s Body Alters Self-Other Face Distinction

Dobricki, M., & Mohler, B. (2015). Self-Identification With Another’s Body Alters Self-Other Face Distinction. Perception, 44(7), 814-820. doi:10.1177/0301006615594697.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-457A-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-1CD9-C
Genre: Journal Article

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Dobricki, M1, 2, Author              
Mohler, BJ2, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              
3Research Group Space and Body Perception, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_2528693              

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 Abstract: When looking into a mirror healthy humans usually clearly perceive their own face. Such an unambiguous face self-perception indicates that an individual has a discrete facial self-representation and thereby the involvement of a self-other face distinction mechanism. We have stroked the trunk of healthy individuals while they watched the trunk of a virtual human that was facing them being synchronously stroked. Subjects sensed self-identification with the virtual body, which was accompanied by a decrease of their self-other face distinction. This suggests that face self-perception involves the self-other face distinction and that this mechanism is underlying the formation of a discrete representation of one’s face. Moreover, the self-identification with another’s body that we find suggests that the perception of one’s full body affects the self-other face distinction. Hence, changes in self-other face distinction can indicate alterations of body self-perception, and thereby serve to elucidate the relationship of face and body self-perception.

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 Dates: 2015-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1177/0301006615594697
BibTex Citekey: DobrickiM2015
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Title: Perception
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 44 (7) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 814 - 820 Identifier: -