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  Learning anticipatory eye-movements for control

Chuang, L., Nieuwenhuizen, F., Walter, J., & Bülthoff, H. (2015). Learning anticipatory eye-movements for control. In C. Bermeitinger, A. Mojzisch, & W. Greve (Eds.), TeaP 2015: Abstracts of the 57th Conference of Experimental Psychologists (pp. 58). Lengerich, Germany: Pabst.

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 Creators:
Chuang, LL1, 2, Author              
Nieuwenhuizen, FM1, 2, Author              
Walter, J1, 2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Anticipatory eye-movements (or look-ahead fixations) are often observed in complex closed-loop control tasks, such as steering a vehicle on a non-straight path (Land & Lee, 1994). This eye-movement behavior allows the observer to switch between different visual cues that are relevant for minimizing present and future control errors (Wilkie, Wann, & Allison, 2008). Here, we asked: Are anticipatory eye-movements generic or are they acquired according to the learning environment? We trained and tested 27 participants on a control system, which simulated the simplified dynamics of a rotorcraft. Participants had to translate laterally along a specified path while maintaining a fixed altitude. Ground and vertical landmarks provided respective visual cues. Training took place under one of three possible field-of-view conditions (height x width: 60° x 60°; 60° x 180°; 125° x 180°), while testing took place in an unrestricted field-of-view environment (125° x 230°). We found that restricting the field-of-view during training significantly decreases the number of anticipatory eye-movements during testing. This effect can be largely attributed to the size of the horizontal field-of-view. Our finding suggests that anticipatory eye-movements for closed-loop control are shaped by the conditions of the training environment.

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 Dates: 2015-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: ChuangNWB2015
DOI: 10.23668/psycharchives.876
 Degree: -

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Title: 57th Conference of Experimental Psychologists (TeaP 2015)
Place of Event: Hildesheim, Germany
Start-/End Date: 2015-03-08 - 2015-03-11

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Title: TeaP 2015: Abstracts of the 57th Conference of Experimental Psychologists
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Bermeitinger, C, Editor
Mojzisch, A, Editor
Greve, W, Editor
Affiliations:
-
Publ. Info: Lengerich, Germany : Pabst
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 58 Identifier: ISBN: 978-3-95853-045-4