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  The Perceptual Homunculus: The Perception of the Relative Proportions of the Human Body

Linkenauger, S., Wong, H., Geuss, M., Stefanucci, J., McCulloch, K., Bülthoff, H., et al. (2015). The Perceptual Homunculus: The Perception of the Relative Proportions of the Human Body. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 144(1), 103-113. doi:10.1037/xge0000028.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-4776-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-1CE9-A
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Linkenauger, SA, Author              
Wong, Hy, Author
Geuss, M, Author              
Stefanucci, JK, Author              
McCulloch, KC, Author
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Mohler, BJ2, 3, Author              
Proffitt, DR, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              
3Research Group Space and Body Perception, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_2528693              

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 Abstract: Given that observing one’s body is ubiquitous in experience, it is natural to assume that people accurately perceive the relative sizes of their body parts. This assumption is mistaken. In a series of studies, we show that there are dramatic systematic distortions in the perception of bodily proportions, as assessed by visual estimation tasks, where participants were asked to compare the lengths of two body parts. These distortions are not evident when participants estimate the extent of a body part relative to a noncorporeal object or when asked to estimate noncorporal objects that are the same length as their body parts. Our results reveal a radical asymmetry in the perception of corporeal and noncorporeal relative size estimates. Our findings also suggest that people visually perceive the relative size of their body parts as a function of each part’s relative tactile sensitivity and physical size.

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 Dates: 2015-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1037/xge0000028
BibTex Citekey: LinkenaugerPMCBSGW2014
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Title: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 144 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 103 - 113 Identifier: -