English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  High-resolution quantitative sodium imaging at 9.4 tesla

Mirkes, C., Hoffmann, J., Shajan, G., Pohmann, R., & Scheffler, K. (2015). High-resolution quantitative sodium imaging at 9.4 tesla. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 73(1), 342-351. doi:10.1002/mrm.25096.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-4795-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-B748-1
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Mirkes, CC1, Author              
Hoffmann, J1, Author              
Shajan, G1, Author              
Pohmann, R1, 2, Author              
Scheffler, K1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497796              
2Dept. Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Max Planck Society, ou_1497647              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Purpose Investigation of the feasibility to perform high-resolution quantitative sodium imaging at 9.4 Tesla (T). Methods A proton patch antenna was combined with a sodium birdcage coil to provide a proton signal without compromising the efficiency of the X-nucleus coil. Sodium density weighted images with a nominal resolution of 1 × 1 × 5 mm3 were acquired within 30 min with an ultrashort echo time sequence. The methods used for signal calibration as well as for B0, B1, and off-resonance correction were verified on a phantom and five healthy volunteers. Results An actual voxel volume of roughly 40 μL could be achieved at 9.4T, while maintaining an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio (8 for brain tissue and 35 for cerebrospinal fluid). The measured mean sodium concentrations for gray and white matter were 36 ± 2 and 31 ± 1 mmol/L of wet tissue, which are comparable to values previously reported in the literature. Conclusion The reduction of partial volume effects is essential for accurate measurement of the sodium concentration in the human brain. Ultrahigh field imaging is a viable tool to achieve this goal due to its increased sensitivity.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2015-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/mrm.25096
BibTex Citekey: MirkesHSPS2014
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 73 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 342 - 351 Identifier: -