English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Self-driven jamming in growing microbial populations.

Delarue, M., Hartung, J., Schreck, C., Gniewek, P., Hu, L., Herminghaus, S., et al. (2016). Self-driven jamming in growing microbial populations. Nature Physics, 12(8), 762-766. doi:10.1038/NPHYS3741.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-5802-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-3D6B-E
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Delarue, Morgan, Author
Hartung, Jörn1, Author              
Schreck, Carl, Author
Gniewek, Pawel, Author
Hu, Lucy, Author
Herminghaus, Stephan1, Author              
Hallatschek, Oskar2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Group Granular matter and irreversibility, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society, ou_2063306              
2Max Planck Research Group Biological Physics and Evolutionary Dynamics, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society, ou_2063291              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: In natural settings, microbes tend to grow in dense populations1, 2, 3, 4 where they need to push against their surroundings to accommodate space for new cells. The associated contact forces play a critical role in a variety of population-level processes, including biofilm formation5, 6, 7, the colonization of porous media8, 9, and the invasion of biological tissues10, 11, 12. Although mechanical forces have been characterized at the single-cell level13, 14, 15, 16, it remains elusive how collective pushing forces result from the combination of single-cell forces. Here, we reveal a collective mechanism of confinement, which we call self-driven jamming, that promotes the build-up of large mechanical pressures in microbial populations. Microfluidic experiments on budding yeast populations in space-limited environments show that self-driven jamming arises from the gradual formation and sudden collapse of force chains driven by microbial proliferation, extending the framework of driven granular matter17, 18, 19, 20. The resulting contact pressures can become large enough to slow down cell growth, to delay the cell cycle in the G1 phase, and to strain or even destroy the micro-environment through crack propagation. Our results suggest that self-driven jamming and build-up of large mechanical pressures is a natural tendency of microbes growing in confined spaces, contributing to microbial pathogenesis and biofouling21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-05-092016-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS3741
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Nature Physics
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 12 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 762 - 766 Identifier: ISSN: 1745-2473