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  The wandering mind in borderline personality disorder: Instability in self- and other-related thoughts

Kanske, P., Schulze, L., Dziobek, I., Scheibner, H., Roepke, S., & Singer, T. (2016). The wandering mind in borderline personality disorder: Instability in self- and other-related thoughts. Psychiatry Research, 242, 302-310. doi:10.1016/j.psychres.2016.05.060.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-C0BD-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1BC8-E
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Kanske, Philipp1, Author              
Schulze, Lars2, Author
Dziobek, Isabel3, Author
Scheibner, Hannah3, Author
Roepke, Stefan4, Author
Singer, Tania1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
2Department of Education and Psychology, FU Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department Psychiatry, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Borderline personality disorders; Mind-wandering; Self-generated thought; Identity; Self-other representations; Interpersonal relationships
 Abstract: Diagnostic criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD) include instability in identity and interpersonal relationships. Here, we probed whether instability is already present in BPD patients’ thoughts about themselves and others. We tested BPD patients (N=27) and healthy controls (N=25) with a mind-wandering task that assesses content and variability of stimulus-independent self-generated thoughts. Multi-level modeling revealed that while BPD patients and healthy controls mind-wander to a similar extent, BPD patients’ thoughts are colored predominantly negatively. Most importantly, although their thoughts concerned the self and others as much as in controls, they fluctuated more strongly in the degree to which their thoughts concerned themselves and others and also gave more extreme ratings. Self- and other related thoughts that were more extreme were also more negative in valence. The increased variability supports current conceptualizations of BPD and may account for the instability in identity and interpersonal relationships.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-05-302015-11-022016-05-302016-06-022016-08-30
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.05.060
PMID: 27318635
Other: Epub 2016
 Degree: -

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Title: Psychiatry Research
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 242 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 302 - 310 Identifier: ISSN: 0165-1781
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925481603