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  Analysis and in vivo disruption of the gene coding for adenylate kinase (ADK1) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Konrad, M. (1988). Analysis and in vivo disruption of the gene coding for adenylate kinase (ADK1) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Journal of Biological Chemsitry, 263(36), 19468-19474.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-CEB9-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-CEC8-5
Genre: Journal Article

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Konrad, M.1, Author              
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1Research Group of Enzyme Biochemistry, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578612              

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 Abstract: The gene (designated ADK1) encoding the so-called cytosolic adenylate kinase of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was isolated using a single mixed oligonucleotide hybridization probe designed from the published amino acid sequence. ADK1 was found to be identical to an adenylate kinase gene recently isolated by an approach entirely different from ours (Magdolen, V., Oechsner, U., and Bandlow, W. (1987) Curr. Genet. 12, 405-411). The gene resides on yeast chromosome IV adjacent to the histone gene H2A-1. Southern blot analysis revealed only one copy of the gene, and no other related yeast DNA sequences were detected. By gene disruption it is shown that the ADK1 gene is needed for normal cell proliferation but is not essential for cell viability. Immunological studies confirmed the absence of the ADK1 gene product in mutant cells; in extracts of total cellular protein, however, there were still about 10% of the wild-type enzymatic activity present. This indicates the existence of two or more adenylate kinase isozymes in yeast. From preliminary 31P NMR measurements on suspensions of yeast cells, a significant decrease in the level of nucleoside triphosphates was found in the mutant strain carrying the disrupted and partially deleted ADK1 locus.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 1988-12-25
 Publication Status: Published in print
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Title: Journal of Biological Chemsitry
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 263 (36) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 19468 - 19474 Identifier: -