English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Communication at the garden fence - context dependent vocalization in female house mice

Hoier, S., Pfeifle, C., von Merten, S., & Linnenbrink, M. (2016). Communication at the garden fence - context dependent vocalization in female house mice. PLoS One, 11(3), e0152255. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0152255.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-BAC7-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-BAC8-E
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
journal.pone.0152255&type=printable (Publisher version), 2MB
Name:
journal.pone.0152255&type=printable
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Hoier, Svenja1, Author              
Pfeifle, Christine1, Author              
von Merten, Sophie, Author
Linnenbrink, Miriam1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445635              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Syllables; Vocalization; Social communication; Mice; Animal signaling and communication; Urine; Bioacoustics; Acoustic signals
 Abstract: House mice (Mus musculus) live in social groups where they frequently interact with conspecifics, thus communication (e.g. chemical and/or auditory) is essential. It is commonly known that male and female mice produce complex vocalizations in the ultrasonic range (USV) that remind of high-pitched birdsong (so called mouse song) which is mainly used in social interactions. Earlier studies suggest that mice use their USVs for mate attraction and mate choice, but they could also be used as signal during hierarchy establishment and familiarization, or other communication purposes. In this study we elucidated the vocalization behaviour of interacting female mice over an extended period of time under semi-natural conditions. We asked, if the rate or structure of female vocalization differs between different social and non-social contexts. We found that female USV is mainly used in social contexts, driven by direct communication to an unknown individual, the rate of which is decreased over time by a familiarization process. In addition we could show that female mice use two distinct types of USVs, differing in their frequency, which they use differently depending on whether they directly or indirectly communicate with another female. This supports the notion that vocalization in mice is context dependent, driven by a reasonable and yet underestimated amount of complexity that also involves the interplay between different sensory signals, like chemical and auditory cues.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-10-092016-03-132016-03-292016
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0152255
BibTex Citekey: Hoier2016
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: 21 Seiten Volume / Issue: 11 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: e0152255 Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: /journals/resource/1000000000277850