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  Long-term microbiota and virome in a Zürich patient after fecal transplantation against Clostridium difficile infection

Broecker, F., Klumpp, J., & Moelling, K. (2016). Long-term microbiota and virome in a Zürich patient after fecal transplantation against Clostridium difficile infection. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1372(1), 29-41. doi:10.1111/nyas.13100.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-E5C7-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-5F24-E
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Broecker, Felix1, Author              
Klumpp, Jochen, Author
Moelling, Karin, Author
Affiliations:
1Chakkumal Anish, Biomolekulare Systeme, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863299              

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Free keywords: Clostridium difficile, fecal microbiota therapy, virome, phages, megavirome
 Abstract: Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an emerging therapeutic option for Clostridium difficile infections that are refractory to conventional treatment. FMT introduces fecal microbes into the patient's intestine that prevent the recurrence of C. difficile, leading to rapid expansion of bacteria characteristic of healthy microbiota. However, the long-term effects of FMT remain largely unknown. The C. difficile patient described in this paper revealed protracted microbiota adaptation processes from 6 to 42 months post-FMT. Ultimately, bacterial communities were donor similar, suggesting sustainable stool engraftment. Since little is known about the consequences of transmitted viruses during C. difficile infection, we also interrogated virome changes. Our approach allowed identification of about 10 phage types per sample that represented larger viral communities, and phages were found to be equally abundant in the cured patient and donor. The healthy microbiota appears to be characterized by low phage abundance. Although viruses were likely transferred, the patient established a virome distinct from the donor. Surprisingly, the patient had sequences of algal giant viruses (chloroviruses) that have not previously been reported for the human gut. Chloroviruses have not been associated with intestinal disease, but their presence in the oropharynx may influence cognitive abilities. The findings suggest that the virome is an important indicator of health or disease. A better understanding of the role of viruses in the gut ecosystem may uncover novel microbiota-modulating therapeutic strategies.

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 Dates: 2016-06-102016
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Table of Contents: -
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/nyas.13100
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Title: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  Other : Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York : New York Academy of Sciences
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 1372 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 29 - 41 Identifier: ISSN: 0077-8923