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  Temporal voice areas exist in autism spectrum disorder but are dysfunctional for voice identity recognition

Schelinski, S., Borowiak, K., & von Kriegstein, K. (2016). Temporal voice areas exist in autism spectrum disorder but are dysfunctional for voice identity recognition. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 11(11), 1812-1822. doi:10.1093/scan/nsw089.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-EDC8-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1F11-8
Genre: Journal Article

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Schelnski_Borowiak_2016.pdf (Publisher version), 451KB
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 Creators:
Schelinski, Stefanie1, Author              
Borowiak, Kamila1, 2, Author              
von Kriegstein, Katharina1, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              
2Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Autism spectrum disorder; Voice recognition; Auditory; Person identity recognition; Superior temporal sulcus
 Abstract: The ability to recognise the identity of others is a key requirement for successful communication. Brain regions that respond selectively to voices exist in humans from early infancy on. Currently, it is unclear whether dysfunction of these voice-sensitive regions can explain voice identity recognition impairments. Here, we used two independent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies to investigate voice processing in a population that has been reported to have no voice-sensitive regions: autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Our results refute the earlier report that individuals with ASD have no responses in voice-sensitive regions: Passive listening to vocal, compared to non-vocal, sounds elicited typical responses in voice-sensitive regions in the high-functioning ASD group and controls. In contrast, the ASD group had a dysfunction in voice-sensitive regions during voice identity but not speech recognition in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus/gyrus (STS/STG)—a region implicated in processing complex spectrotemporal voice features and unfamiliar voices. The right anterior STS/STG correlated with voice identity recognition performance in controls but not in the ASD group. The findings suggest that right STS/STG dysfunction is critical for explaining voice recognition impairments in high-functioning ASD and show that ASD is not characterised by a general lack of voice-sensitive responses.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-05-052016-02-022016-06-202016-06-302016-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/scan/nsw089
PMID: 27369067
PMC: PMC5091681
Other: Epub 2016
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Title: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
  Other : SCAN
  Abbreviation : Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 (11) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1812 - 1822 Identifier: ISSN: 1749-5016
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000223760