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  Traits to stay, traits to move: a review of functional traits to assess sensitivity and adaptive capacity of temperate and boreal trees to climate change

Aubin, I., Munson, A. D., Cardou, F., Burton, P. J., Isabel, N., Pedlar, J. H., et al. (2016). Traits to stay, traits to move: a review of functional traits to assess sensitivity and adaptive capacity of temperate and boreal trees to climate change. Environmental Reviews, 24, 164-186. doi:10.1139/er-2015-0072.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-ECEC-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-EE67-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Aubin, I., Author
Munson, A. D., Author
Cardou, F., Author
Burton, P. J., Author
Isabel, N., Author
Pedlar, J. H., Author
Paquette, A., Author
Taylor, A. R., Author
Delagrange, S., Author
Kebli, H., Author
Messier, C., Author
Shipley, B., Author
Valladares, F., Author
Kattge, Jens1, Author              
Boisvert-Marsh, L., Author
McKenney, D., Author
Affiliations:
1Interdepartmental Max Planck Fellow Group Functional Biogeography, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1938314              

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 Abstract: The integration of functional traits into vulnerability assessments is a promising approach to quantitatively capture differences in species sensitivity and adaptive capacity to climate change, allowing the refinement of tree species distribution models. In response to a clear need to identify traits that are responsive to climate change and applicable in amanagement context, we review the state of knowledge of the main mechanisms, and their associated traits, that underpin the ability of boreal and temperate tree species to persist and (or) shift their distribution in a changing climate. We aimed to determine whether current knowledge is sufficiently mature and available to be used effectively in vulnerability assessments. Marshalling recent conceptual advances and assessing data availability, our ultimate objective is to guide modellers and practitioners in finding and selecting sets of traits that can be used to capture differences in species’ ability to persist and migrate. While the physiological mechanisms that determine sensitivity to climate change are relatively well understood (e.g., drought-induced cavitation),manyassociated traits have not been systematically documented for North American trees and differences in methodology preclude their widespread integration into vulnerability assessments (e.g., xylem recovery capacity). In contrast, traits traditionally associated with the ability to migrate and withstand fire are generally well documented, but new key traits are emerging in the context of climate change that have not been as well characterized (e.g., age of optimum seed production). More generally, lack of knowledge surrounding the extent and patterns in intraspecific trait variation, as well as co-variation and interaction among traits, limit our ability to use this approach to assess tree adaptive capacity.We conclude by outlining research needs and potential strategies for the development of trait-based knowledge applicable in large-scale modelling efforts, sketching out important aspects of trait data organization that should be part of a coordinated effort by the forest science community.

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 Dates: 2016-02-222016-06-232016
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: Other: BGC2476
DOI: 10.1139/er-2015-0072
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Title: Environmental Reviews
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: National Research Council of Canada
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 24 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 164 - 186 Identifier: Other: 1208-6053
CoNE: /journals/resource/1208-6053