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  Neural correlates of metacognitive ability and of feeling confident: A large scale fMRI study

Molenberghs, P., Trautwein, F.-M., Böckler, A., Singer, T., & Kanske, P. (2016). Neural correlates of metacognitive ability and of feeling confident: A large scale fMRI study. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 11(12), 1942-1951. doi:10.1093/scan/nsw093.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-017A-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-608C-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Molenberghs, Pascal1, Author
Trautwein, Fynn-Mathis2, Author              
Böckler, Anne2, Author              
Singer, Tania2, Author              
Kanske, Philipp2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Monash Institute of Clinical Cognitive Neuroscience, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, ou_persistent22              
2Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              

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Free keywords: Metacognition; fMRI; Confidence; Decision making; Social neuroscience
 Abstract: One important aspect of metacognition is the ability to accurately evaluate one’s performance. People vary widely in their metacognitive ability and in general are too confident when evaluating their performance. This often leads to poor decision making with potentially disastrous consequences. To further our understanding of the neural underpinnings of these processes, this fMRI study investigated inter-individual differences in metacognitive ability and effects of trial-by-trial variation in subjective feelings of confidence when making metacognitive assessments. Participants (N = 308) evaluated their performance in a high-level social and cognitive reasoning task. The results showed that higher metacognitive accuracy was associated with a decrease in activation in the anterior medial prefrontal cortex, an area previously linked to metacognition on perception and memory. Moreover, the feeling of confidence about one’s choices was associated with an increase of activation in reward, memory and motor related areas including bilateral striatum and hippocampus, while less confidence was associated with activation in areas linked with negative affect and uncertainty, including dorsomedial prefrontal and bilateral orbitofrontal cortex. This might indicate that positive affect is related to higher confidence thereby biasing metacognitive decisions towards overconfidence. In support, behavioural analyses revealed that increased confidence was associated with lower metacognitive accuracy.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-06-232015-10-222016-07-112016-07-212016-12-20
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/scan/nsw093
PMID: 27445213
PMC: PMC5141950
Other: Epub 2016
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Title: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
  Other : SCAN
  Abbreviation : Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 (12) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1942 - 1951 Identifier: ISSN: 1749-5016
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000223760