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  The neural networks of subjectively evaluated emotional conflicts

Rohr, C., Villringer, A., Solms-Baruth, C., van der Meer, E., Margulies, D. S., & Okon-Singer, H. (2016). The neural networks of subjectively evaluated emotional conflicts. Human Brain Mapping, 37(6), 2234-2246. doi:10.1002/hbm.23169.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-11CB-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1D32-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Rohr, Christiane1, 2, 3, Author              
Villringer, Arno1, 2, Author              
Solms-Baruth, Carolina1, 2, Author
van der Meer, Elke3, Author
Margulies, Daniel S.1, 2, 4, Author              
Okon-Singer, Hadas1, 2, 5, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Max Planck Research Group Neuroanatomy and Connectivity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356546              
5Department of Psychology, University of Haifa, Israel, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Conflict; Free viewing; Functional connectivity; fMRI; Emotion control; Superior temporal sulcus; Inferior parietal lobule; Amygdala
 Abstract: Previous work on the neural underpinnings of emotional conflict processing has largely focused on designs that instruct participants to ignore a distracter which conflicts with a target. In contrast, this study investigated the noninstructed experience and evaluation of an emotional conflict, where positive or negative cues can be subjectively prioritized. To this end, healthy participants freely watched short film scenes that evoked emotional conflicts while their BOLD responses were measured. Participants' individual ratings of conflict and valence perception during the film scenes were collected immediately afterwards, and the individual ratings were regressed against the BOLD data. Our analyses revealed that (a) amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex were significantly involved in prioritizing positive or negative cues, but not in subjective evaluations of conflict per se, and (b) superior temporal sulcus (STS) and inferior parietal lobule (IPL), which have been implicated in social cognition and emotion control, were involved in both prioritizing positive or negative cues and subjectively evaluating conflict, and may thus constitute “hubs” or “switches” in emotional conflict processing. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analyses further revealed stronger functional connectivity between IPL and ventral prefrontal—medial parietal areas in prioritizing negative cues, and stronger connectivity between STS and dorsal-rostral prefrontal—medial parietal areas in prioritizing positive cues. In sum, our results suggest that IPL and STS are important in the subjective evaluation of complex conflicts and influence valence prioritization via prefrontal and parietal control centers.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-02-192015-05-202016-02-222016-05-142016-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/hbm.23169
PMID: 26991156
Other: Epub 2016
 Degree: -

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Title: Human Brain Mapping
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York : Wiley-Liss
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 37 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2234 - 2246 Identifier: ISSN: 1065-9471
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925601686