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  Rapid and specific gray matter changes in M1 induced by balance training

Taubert, M., Mehnert, J., Pleger, B., & Villringer, A. (2016). Rapid and specific gray matter changes in M1 induced by balance training. NeuroImage, 133, 399-407. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.03.017.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-11D1-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1BD1-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Taubert, Marco1, Author              
Mehnert, Jan1, 2, Author              
Pleger, Burkhard1, 2, Author              
Villringer, Arno1, 2, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: MRI; Learning; Balance; Plasticity; Rapid; Cortical thickness
 Abstract: Training-induced changes in cortical structure can be observed non-invasively with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While macroscopic changes were found mainly after weeks to several months of training in humans, imaging of motor cortical networks in animals revealed rapid microstructural alterations after a few hours of training. We used MRI to test the hypothesis of immediate and specific training-induced alterations in motor cortical gray matter in humans. We found localized increases in motor cortical thickness after 1 h of practice in a complex balancing task. These changes were specific to motor cortical effector representations primarily responsible for balance control in our task (lower limb and trunk) and these effects could be confirmed in a replication study. Cortical thickness changes (i) linearly increased across the training session, (ii) occurred independent of alterations in resting cerebral blood flow and (iii) were not triggered by repetitive use of the lower limbs. Our findings show that motor learning triggers rapid and specific gray matter changes in M1.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-10-192016-03-072016-03-172016-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.03.017
PMID: 26994831
Other: Epub 2016
 Degree: -

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 133 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 399 - 407 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166