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  Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over primary motor cortex leg area promotes dynamic balance task performance

Kaminski, E., Steele, C., Hoff, M., Gundlach, C., Rjosk, V., Sehm, B., et al. (2016). Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over primary motor cortex leg area promotes dynamic balance task performance. Clinical Neurophysiology, 127(6), 2455-2462. doi:10.1016/j.clinph.2016.03.018.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-11DA-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-19BF-B
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Kaminski, Elisabeth1, Author              
Steele, Christopher1, 2, Author              
Hoff, Maike1, 3, Author              
Gundlach, Christopher1, 4, Author              
Rjosk, Viola1, Author              
Sehm, Bernhard1, Author              
Villringer, Arno1, 5, Author              
Ragert, Patrick1, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Cerebral Imaging Center, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada, ou_persistent22              
3Institute of General Kinesiology and Athletics Training, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Experimental Psychology and Methods, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Balance in humans; Non-invasive brain stimulation; Kinematics; Velocity
 Abstract: Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of facilitatory anodal tDCS (a-tDCS) applied over the leg area of the primary motor cortex on learning a complex whole-body dynamic balancing task (DBT). We hypothesized that a-tDCS during DBT enhances learning performance compared to sham tDCS (s-tDCS). Methods In a randomized, parallel design, we applied either a-tDCS (n = 13) or s-tDCS (n = 13) in a total of 26 young subjects while they perform the DBT. Task performance and error rates were compared between groups. Additionally, we investigated the effect of tDCS on the relationship between performance and kinematic variables capturing different aspects of task execution. Results A-tDCS over M1 leg area promotes balance performance in a DBT relative to s-tDCS, indicated by higher performance and smaller error scores. Furthermore, a-tDCS seems to mediate the relationship between DBT performance and the kinematic variable velocity. Conclusions Our findings provide novel evidence for the ability of tDCS to improve dynamic balance learning, a fact, particularly important in the context of treating balance and gait disorders. Significance TDCS facilitates dynamic balance performance by strengthening the inverse relationship of performance and velocity, thus making tDCS one potential technique to improve walking ability or help to prevent falls in patients in the future.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-03-092016-04-012016-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.clinph.2016.03.018
PMID: 27178865
Other: Epub 2016
 Degree: -

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Title: Clinical Neurophysiology
  Other : Clin. Neurophysiol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 127 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2455 - 2462 Identifier: ISSN: 1388-2457
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954926941726