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  Sharing self-related information is associated with intrinsic functional connectivity of cortical midline brain regions

Meshi, D., Mamerow, L., Kirilina, E., Morawetz, C., Margulies, D. S., & Heekeren, H. (2016). Sharing self-related information is associated with intrinsic functional connectivity of cortical midline brain regions. Scientific Reports, 6: 22491. doi:10.1038/srep22491.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-1F4A-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1DF2-C
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Meshi, Dar1, Author
Mamerow, Loreen1, Author
Kirilina, Evgeniya1, 2, Author              
Morawetz, Carmen1, Author
Margulies, Daniel S.3, Author              
Heekeren, Hauke1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Education and Psychology, FU Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Center for Cognitive Neuroscience Berlin (CCNB), FU Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Max Planck Research Group Neuroanatomy and Connectivity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356546              

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 Abstract: Human beings are social animals and they vary in the degree to which they share information about themselves with others. Although brain networks involved in self-related cognition have been identified, especially via the use of resting-state experiments, the neural circuitry underlying individual differences in the sharing of self-related information is currently unknown. Therefore, we investigated the intrinsic functional organization of the brain with respect to participants’ degree of self-related information sharing using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and self-reported social media use. We conducted seed-based correlation analyses in cortical midline regions previously shown in meta-analyses to be involved in self-referential cognition: the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), central precuneus (CP), and caudal anterior cingulate cortex (CACC). We examined whether and how functional connectivity between these regions and the rest of the brain was associated with participants’ degree of self-related information sharing. Analyses revealed associations between the MPFC and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), as well as the CP with the right DLPFC, the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex and left anterior temporal pole. These findings extend our present knowledge of functional brain connectivity, specifically demonstrating how the brain’s intrinsic functional organization relates to individual differences in the sharing of self-related information.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-07-142016-02-122016-03-07
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/srep22491
PMID: 26948055
PMC: PMC4780087
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Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 6 Sequence Number: 22491 Start / End Page: - Identifier: Other: 2045-2322
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2045-2322