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  Predictions interact with missing sensory evidence in semantic processing areas

Scharinger, M., Bendixen, A., Herrmann, B., Henry, M., Mildner, T., & Obleser, J. (2016). Predictions interact with missing sensory evidence in semantic processing areas. Human Brain Mapping, 37(2), 704-716. doi:10.1002/hbm.23060.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-2074-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1D40-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Scharinger, Mathias1, 2, Author              
Bendixen, Andrea3, Author
Herrmann, Björn1, 4, Author              
Henry, Molly1, 4, Author              
Mildner, Toralf5, Author              
Obleser, Jonas1, 6, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Auditory Cognition, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_751545              
2Department of Language and Literature, Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, Frankfurt, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, TU Chemnitz, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Psychology, Brain and Mind Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada, ou_persistent22              
5Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634558              
6Department of Psychology, University of Lübeck, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: fMRI; Incomplete speech; Predictive mechanisms; Semantic context; Sentence processing; Angular gyrus
 Abstract: Human brain function draws on predictive mechanisms that exploit higher-level context during lower-level perception. These mechanisms are particularly relevant for situations in which sensory information is compromised or incomplete, as for example in natural speech where speech segments may be omitted due to sluggish articulation. Here, we investigate which brain areas support the processing of incomplete words that were predictable from semantic context, compared with incomplete words that were unpredictable. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants heard sentences that orthogonally varied in predictability (semantically predictable vs. unpredictable) and completeness (complete vs. incomplete, i.e. missing their final consonant cluster). The effects of predictability and completeness interacted in heteromodal semantic processing areas, including left angular gyrus and left precuneus, where activity did not differ between complete and incomplete words when they were predictable. The same regions showed stronger activity for incomplete than for complete words when they were unpredictable. The interaction pattern suggests that for highly predictable words, the speech signal does not need to be complete for neural processing in semantic processing areas.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-11-062015-06-042015-11-082016-01-182016-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/hbm.23060
PMID: 26583355
Other: Epub 2015
 Degree: -

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Title: Human Brain Mapping
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York : Wiley-Liss
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 37 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 704 - 716 Identifier: ISSN: 1065-9471
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925601686