English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Mirror visual feedback-induced performance improvement and the influence of hand dominance

Rjosk, V., Kaminski, E., Hoff, M., Sehm, B., Steele, C., Villringer, A., et al. (2016). Mirror visual feedback-induced performance improvement and the influence of hand dominance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 9: 702. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2015.00702.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-215F-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1DF7-7
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Rjosk_2016.pdf (Publisher version), 655KB
Name:
Rjosk_2016.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Rjosk, Viola1, Author              
Kaminski, Elisabeth1, Author              
Hoff, Maike1, 2, Author              
Sehm, Bernhard1, Author              
Steele, Christopher1, 3, Author              
Villringer, Arno1, 4, Author              
Ragert, Patrick1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Institute of General Kinesiology and Athletics Training, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada, ou_persistent22              
4Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Mirror visual feedback (MVF); Hand dominance; Motor learning; Motor skill learning; Handedness
 Abstract: Mirror visual feedback (MVF) is a promising technique in clinical settings that can be used to augment performance of an untrained limb. Several studies with healthy volunteers and patients using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) indicate that functional alterations within primary motor cortex (M1) might be one candidate mechanism that could explain MVF-induced changes in behavior. Until now, most studies have used MVF to improve performance of the non-dominant hand (NDH). The question remains if the behavioral effect of MVF differs according to hand dominance. Here, we conducted a study with two groups of young, healthy right-handed volunteers who performed a complex ball-rotation task while receiving MVF of the dominant (n = 16, group 1, MVFDH) or NDH (n = 16, group 2, MVFNDH). We found no significant differences in baseline performance of the untrained hand between groups before MVF was applied. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the amount of performance improvement between MVFDH and MVFNDH indicating that the outcome of MVF seems not to be influenced by hand dominance. Thus our findings might have important implications in neurorehabilitation suggesting that patients suffering from unilateral motor impairments might benefit from MVF regardless of the dominance of the affected limb.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-10-302015-12-142016-01-20
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2015.00702
PMID: 26834605
PMC: PMC4720001
Other: eCollection 2015
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Hum Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 Sequence Number: 702 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5161
CoNE: /journals/resource/1662-5161