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  Early word segmentation in naturalistic environments: Limited effects of speech register

Schreiner, M. S., Altvater-Mackensen, N., & Mani, N. (2016). Early word segmentation in naturalistic environments: Limited effects of speech register. Infancy, 21(5), 625-647. doi:10.1111/infa.12133.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-21EC-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-6278-6
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Schreiner, Melanie S.1, Author              
Altvater-Mackensen, Nicole1, 2, Author              
Mani, Nivedita1, Author
Affiliations:
1Research Group Psychology of Language, Georg August University, Göttingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Max Planck Research Group Early Social Development, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356545              

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 Abstract: We examined 7.5-month-old infants' ability to segment words from infant- and adult-directed speech (IDS and ADS). In particular, we extended the standard design of most segmentation studies by including a phase where infants were repeatedly exposed to target word recordings at their own home (extended exposure) in addition to a laboratory-based familiarization. This enabled us to examine infants' segmentation of words from speech input in their naturalistic environment, extending current findings to learning outside the laboratory. Results of a modified preferential-listening task show that infants listened longer to isolated tokens of familiarized words from home relative to novel control words regardless of register. However, infants showed no recognition of words exposed to during purely laboratory-based familiarization. This indicates that infants succeed in retaining words in long-term memory following extended exposure and recognizing them later on with considerable flexibility. In addition, infants segmented words from both IDS and ADS, suggesting limited effects of speech register on learning from extended exposure in naturalistic environments. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between segmentation success and infants' attention to ADS, but not to IDS, during the extended exposure phase. This finding speaks to current language acquisition models assuming that infants' individual attention to language stimuli drives successful learning.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-01-142015-05-062016-01-252016-02-232016-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/infa.12133
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Title: Infancy
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 21 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 625 - 647 Identifier: ISSN: 1532-7078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/957956311003