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  Local environment but not genetic differentiation influences biparental care in ten plover populations

Vincze, O., Székely, T., Küpper, C., Alrashidi, M., Amat, J. A., Argüelles-Ticó, A., et al. (2013). Local environment but not genetic differentiation influences biparental care in ten plover populations. PLoS One, 8(4): e60998. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0060998.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-2534-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-EA9F-4
Genre: Journal Article

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Vincze, O., Author
Székely, T., Author
Küpper, Clemens1, Author              
Alrashidi, M., Author
Amat, J. A., Author
Argüelles-Ticó, A., Author
Burgas, D., Author
Burke, T., Author
Cavitt, J., Author
Figuerola, J., Author
Shobrak, M., Author
Montalvo, T., Author
Kosztolányi, A., Author
Affiliations:
1University of Sheffield, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Social behaviours are highly variable between species, populations and individuals. However, it is contentious whether behavioural variations are primarily moulded by the environment, caused by genetic differences, or a combination of both. Here we establish that biparental care, a complex social behaviour that involves rearing of young by both parents, differs between closely related populations, and then test two potential sources of variation in parental behaviour between populations: ambient environment and genetic differentiation. We use 2904 hours behavioural data from 10 geographically distinct Kentish (Charadrius alexandrinus) and snowy plover (C. nivosus) populations in America, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa to test these two sources of behavioural variation. We show that local ambient temperature has a significant influence on parental care: with extreme heat (above 40 degrees C) total incubation (i.e. % of time the male or female incubated the nest) increased, and female share (% female share of incubation) decreased. By contrast, neither genetic differences between populations, nor geographic distances predicted total incubation or female's share of incubation. These results suggest that the local environment has a stronger influence on a social behaviour than genetic differentiation, at least between populations of closely related species.

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 Dates: 2013
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: Other: WOS:000317907200023
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0060998
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 (4) Sequence Number: e60998 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: /journals/resource/1000000000277850