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  What pinnipeds have to say about human speech, music, and the evolution of rhythm

Ravignani, A., Fitch, W. T., Hanke, F. D., Heinrich, T., Hurgitsch, B., Kotz, S. A., et al. (2016). What pinnipeds have to say about human speech, music, and the evolution of rhythm. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 10: 274. doi:10.3389/fnins.2016.00274.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-27D6-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1E4E-6
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Ravignani, Andrea1, 2, Author
Fitch, W. Tecumseh3, Author
Hanke, Frederike D.2, Author
Heinrich, Tamara2, Author
Hurgitsch, Bettina4, Author
Kotz, Sonja A.5, 6, Author              
Scharff, Constance7, Author
Stoeger, Angela S.3, Author
de Boer, Bart1, Author
Affiliations:
1Artificial Intelligence Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium, ou_persistent22              
2Research Group "Sensory and Cognitive Ecology", Institute for Biosciences, University of Rostock, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Cognitive Biology, University Vienna, Austria, ou_persistent22              
4Chemnitz Zoo, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Basic and Applied NeuroDynamics Lab, Department of Neuropsychology and Psychopharmacology, Maastricht University, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
6Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
7Department of Animal Behavior, Institute of Biology, FU Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Evolution of speech; Evolution of music; Evolution of language; Vocal learning; Entrainment; Timing; Synchronization; Seal
 Abstract: Research on the evolution of human speech and music benefits from hypotheses and data generated in a number of disciplines. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the high relevance of pinniped research for the study of speech, musical rhythm, and their origins, bridging and complementing current research on primates and birds. We briefly discuss speech, vocal learning, and rhythm from an evolutionary and comparative perspective. We review the current state of the art on pinniped communication and behavior relevant to the evolution of human speech and music, showing interesting parallels to hypotheses on rhythmic behavior in early hominids. We suggest future research directions in terms of species to test and empirical data needed.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-03-042016-05-312016-06-20
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2016.00274
PMID: 27378843
PMC: PMC4913109
Other: eCollection 2016
 Degree: -

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Title: Frontiers in Neuroscience
  Other : Front Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 Sequence Number: 274 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-4548
ISSN: 1662-453X
CoNE: /journals/resource/1662-4548