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  Rhythmic neural activity indicates the contribution of attention and memory to the processing of occluded movements in 10-month-old infants

Bache, C., Kopp, F., Springer, A., Stadler, W., Lindenberger, U., & Werkle-Bergner, M. (2015). Rhythmic neural activity indicates the contribution of attention and memory to the processing of occluded movements in 10-month-old infants. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 98(2), 201-212. doi:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.09.003.

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 Creators:
Bache, Cathleen1, Author
Kopp, Franziska1, Author
Springer, Anne2, Author              
Stadler, Waltraud2, Author              
Lindenberger, Ulman1, Author
Werkle-Bergner, Markus1, Author
Affiliations:
1Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              

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Free keywords: Action perception; Occlusion; Attention; Memory; Sensorimotor simulation; EEG
 Abstract: Infants possess the remarkable capacity to perceive occluded movements as ongoing and coherent. Little is known about the neural mechanisms that enable internal representation of conspecifics' and inanimate objects' movements during visual occlusion. In this study, 10-month-old infants watched briefly occluded human and object movements. Prior to occlusion, continuous and distorted versions of the movement were shown. EEG recordings were used to assess neural activity assumed to relate to processes of attention (occipital alpha), memory (frontal theta), and sensorimotor simulation (central alpha) before, during, and after occlusion. Oscillatory activity was analyzed using an individualized data approach taking idiosyncrasies into account. Results for occipital alpha were consistent with infants' preference for attending to social stimuli. Furthermore, frontal theta activity was more pronounced when tracking distorted as opposed to continuous movement, and when maintaining object as opposed to human movement. Central alpha did not discriminate between experimental conditions. In sum, we conclude that observing occluded movements recruits processes of attention and memory which are modulated by stimulus and movement properties.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-07-172015-05-022015-09-112015-09-142015-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.09.003
PMID: 26381759
Other: Epub 2015
 Degree: -

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Title: International Journal of Psychophysiology
  Other : Int. J. Psychophysiol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 98 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 201 - 212 Identifier: ISSN: 0167-8760
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925484686