English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The neurocognitive development of social- and economic decision-making, overcoming emotional egocentricity and social emotions

Steinbeis, N. (2014). The neurocognitive development of social- and economic decision-making, overcoming emotional egocentricity and social emotions. Talk presented at Department of Psychology. Leiden University, the Netherlands. 2014-06-01 - 2014-06-01.

Item is

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Steinbeis, Nikolaus1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: In this talk I will present findings from three of my major research strands. The first part will focus on the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying the development of decision-making in social and economic settings. Using paradigms derived from economic-game theory, I will show that the development of both prosocial behavior and the ability to delay gratification depends on the increased ability to exert behavioural control in the moment of making a decision and the concurrent maturation of associated neural pathways such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In the second part I will explore the development of overcoming egocentric tendencies when making judgments of others’ emotional states. I will present a series of newly developed paradigms suited to studying emotional egocentricity over a range of domains (i.e. touch, reward, and taste). I will show that the recruitment of right supramarginal gyrus is crucial for overcoming emotional egocentricity bias in adults, that its reduced activation explains increased egocentricity in children and that in Asperger patients this ability remains intact. Finally, I will explore the development of social emotions such as envy and Schadenfreude in ontogeny and compare this to their emergence in our closest living relatives, the chimpanzee. I will close with a discussion of the role of domain-general processes in the development of social behavior and an outlook on my future research agenda.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2014-06
 Publication Status: Not specified
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: -
 Degree: -

Event

show
hide
Title: Department of Psychology
Place of Event: Leiden University, the Netherlands
Start-/End Date: 2014-06-01 - 2014-06-01

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source

show