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  Neural mechanisms of eye contact when listening to another person talking

Jiang, J., Borowiak, K., Tudge, L., Otto, C., & von Kriegstein, K. (2017). Neural mechanisms of eye contact when listening to another person talking. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 12(2), 319-328. doi:10.1093/scan/nsw127.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-565F-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-C7BB-A
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Jiang, Jing1, 2, 3, Author              
Borowiak, Kamila1, 2, Author              
Tudge, Luke2, Author
Otto, Carolin1, Author              
von Kriegstein, Katharina1, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              
2Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Eye contact; Verbal communication; Fixation-based event-related fMRI; Eye tracking; Rapid event-related design
 Abstract: Eye contact occurs frequently and voluntarily during face-to-face verbal communication. However, the neural mechanisms underlying eye contact when it is accompanied by spoken language remain unexplored to date. Here we used a novel approach, fixation-based event-related (FIBER) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to simulate the listener making eye contact with a speaker during verbal communication. Participants’ eye movements and fMRI data were recorded simultaneously while they were freely viewing a pre-recorded speaker talking. The eye tracking data were then used to define events for the fMRI analyses. The results showed that eye contact in contrast to mouth fixation involved visual cortical areas (cuneus, calcarine sulcus), brain regions related to theory of mind/intentionality processing (temporoparietal junction, posterior superior temporal sulcus, medial prefrontal cortex) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In addition, increased effective connectivity was found between these regions for eye contact in contrast to mouth fixations. The results provide first evidence for neural mechanisms underlying eye contact when watching and listening to another person talking. The network we found might be well suited for processing the intentions of communication partners during eye contact in verbal communication.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-07-142016-04-262016-08-242016-08-302017-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/scan/nsw127
PMID: 27576745
PMC: PMC5390711
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
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Funding program : Max Planck Research Grant
Funding organization : Max Planck Society
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Funding organization : China Scholarship Council (CSC)
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Funding program : German Academic Exchange Service scholarship
Funding organization : German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD)

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Title: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
  Other : SCAN
  Abbreviation : Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 12 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 319 - 328 Identifier: ISSN: 1749-5016
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000223760