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  The "silent" imprint of musical training

Klein, C., Liem, F., Hanggi, J., Elmer, S., & Jancke, L. (2016). The "silent" imprint of musical training. Human Brain Mapping, 37(2), 536-546. doi:10.1002/hbm.23045.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-7811-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1A72-0
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Klein, Carina1, Author
Liem, Franz1, Author              
Hanggi, Jürgen1, Author
Elmer, Stefan1, Author
Jancke, Lutz1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Author
Affiliations:
1Division of Neuropsychology, Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
2International Normal Aging and Plasticity Imaging Center, University of Zurich, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
3Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), University of Zurich, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
4University Research Priority Program “Dynamics of Healthy Aging”, University of Zurich, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
5Department of Special Education, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Resting state; Functional connectivity; Musicianship; Musical expertise; Instantaneous coherence
 Abstract: Playing a musical instrument at a professional level is a complex multimodal task requiring information integration between different brain regions supporting auditory, somatosensory, motor, and cognitive functions. These kinds of task-specific activations are known to have a profound influence on both the functional and structural architecture of the human brain. However, until now, it is widely unknown whether this specific imprint of musical practice can still be detected during rest when no musical instrument is used. Therefore, we applied high-density electroencephalography and evaluated whole-brain functional connectivity as well as small-world topologies (i.e., node degree) during resting state in a sample of 15 professional musicians and 15 nonmusicians. As expected, musicians demonstrate increased intra- and interhemispheric functional connectivity between those brain regions that are typically involved in music perception and production, such as the auditory, the sensorimotor, and prefrontal cortex as well as Broca's area. In addition, mean connectivity within this specific network was positively related to musical skill and the total number of training hours. Thus, we conclude that musical training distinctively shapes intrinsic functional network characteristics in such a manner that its signature can still be detected during a task-free condition.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-10-132015-08-252015-10-222016-01-182016-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: pmid26538421
DOI: 10.1002/hbm.23045
PMID: 26538421
Other: Epub 2015
 Degree: -

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Title: Human Brain Mapping
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York : Wiley-Liss
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 37 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 536 - 546 Identifier: ISSN: 1065-9471
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925601686