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  Rostral prefrontal cortex and the focus of attention in prospective memory

Benoit, R. G., Gilbert, S. J., Frith, C. D., & Burgess, P. W. (2012). Rostral prefrontal cortex and the focus of attention in prospective memory. Cerebral Cortex, 22(8), 1876-1886. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhr264.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-7C8C-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-B082-2
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Benoit, Roland G.1, 2, Author              
Gilbert, Sam J.2, Author
Frith, Chris D.3, 4, Author
Burgess, Paul W.2, Author
Affiliations:
1MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
2Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
3Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
4Niels Bohr Project “Interacting Minds", Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University, Denmark, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Anterior prefrontal cortex; Delayed intentions; Frontopolar cortex; fMRI; Task switching
 Abstract: Prospective memory (PM) denotes the function to realize intentions after a delay while being immersed in distracting ongoing (OG) activity. Here, we scrutinize the often-reported involvement of rostral prefrontal cortex (rPFC; approximating Brodmann area 10) in such situations: This region might mediate attention between external stimuli and the internally maintained intention, that is, between stimulus-oriented (SO) and stimulus-independent (SI) processing. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we orthogonally crossed 1) PM versus OG activity only, with 2) SO versus SI attention. In support of the hypothesis, common regions of medial rPFC exhibited greater blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) signal for the contrasts of both OG task only versus PM and SO versus SI attending. However, activation related to the former contrast extended more superiorly, suggesting a functional gradient along a dorsal–ventral axis within this region. Moreover, region-of-interest analyses revealed that PM versus OG task only was associated with greater BOLD signal in left lateral rPFC, reflecting the requirement to maintain delayed intentions. Distinct aspects of this region were also transiently engaged at transitions between SO and SI conditions. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that some of the rostral prefrontal signal changes associated with PM performance reflect relative differences in SO versus SI processing.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-10-042012-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhr264
PMID: 21976356
PMC: PMC3388891
Other: Epub 2011
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Title: Cerebral Cortex
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York, NY : Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 22 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1876 - 1886 Identifier: ISSN: 1047-3211
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925592440