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  Unlocking the potential of supported liquid phase catalysts with supercritical fluids: low temperature continuous flow catalysis with integrated product separation

Franció, G., Hintermair, U., & Leitner, W. (2015). Unlocking the potential of supported liquid phase catalysts with supercritical fluids: low temperature continuous flow catalysis with integrated product separation. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London - Series A: Mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences, 373(2057), 20150005. doi:10.1098/rsta.2015.0005.

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 Creators:
Franció, G.1, 2, Author              
Hintermair, U.3, Author
Leitner, Walter1, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Institut für Technische Chemie und Makromolekulare Chemie, RWTH Aachen University,Worringerweg 2, Aachen 52074, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Service Department Leitner (Technical Labs), Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society, ou_1445626              
3Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY, UK 3Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung,, ou_persistent22              
4Research Group Leitner, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society, ou_1445610              

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Free keywords: supercritical CO2, homogeneous catalysis, supported liquid phases, ionic liquids, catalyst recycling, continuous-flow processing
 Abstract: Solution-phase catalysis using molecular transition metal complexes is an extremely powerful tool for chemical synthesis and a key technology for sustainable manufacturing. However, as the reaction complexity and thermal sensitivity of the catalytic system increase, engineering challenges associated with product separation and catalyst recovery can override the value of the product. This persistent downstream issue often renders industrial exploitation of homogeneous catalysis uneconomical despite impressive batch performance of the catalyst. In this regard, continuous-flow systems that allow steady-state homogeneous turnover in a stationary liquid phase while at the same time effecting integrated product separation at mild process temperatures represent a particularly attractive scenario. While continuous-flow processing is a standard procedure for large volume manufacturing, capitalizing on its potential in the realm of the molecular complexity of organic synthesis is still an emerging area that requires innovative solutions. Here we highlight some recent developments which have succeeded in realizing such systems by the combination of near- and supercritical fluids with homogeneous catalysts in supported liquid phases. The cases discussed exemplify how all three levels of continuous-flow homogeneous catalysis (catalyst system, separation strategy, process scheme) must be matched to locate viable process conditions.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-11-162015-12-28
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1098/rsta.2015.0005
 Degree: -

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Title: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London - Series A: Mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London : Royal Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 373 (2057) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 20150005 Identifier: ISSN: 1364-503X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954928604111_1