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  Fronto-parietal contributions to phonological processes in successful artificial grammar learning

Goranskaya, D., Kreitewolf, J., Mueller, J. L., Friederici, A. D., & Hartwigsen, G. (2016). Fronto-parietal contributions to phonological processes in successful artificial grammar learning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 10: 551. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2016.00551.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-9FB9-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1F15-4
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Goranskaya, Dariya1, Author              
Kreitewolf, Jens1, 2, Author              
Mueller, Jutta L.1, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Hartwigsen, Gesa1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2Department of Psychology, University of Montréal, QC, Canada, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Functional magnetic resonance imaging; Premotor cortex; Parietal cortex; Phonological processes; Auditory processing; Sequence processing; Phonological segmentation; Phoneme comparison; Learning
 Abstract: Sensitivity to regularities plays a crucial role in the acquisition of various linguistic features from spoken language input. Artificial grammar (AG) learning paradigms explore pattern recognition abilities in a set of structured sequences (i.e. of syllables or letters). In the present study, we investigated the functional underpinnings of learning phonological regularities in auditorily presented syllable sequences. While previous neuroimaging studies either focused on functional differences between the processing of correct vs. incorrect sequences or between different levels of sequence complexity, here the focus is on the neural foundation of the actual learning success. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants were exposed to a set of syllable sequences with an underlying phonological rule system, known to ensure performance differences between participants. We expected that successful learning and rule application would require phonological segmentation and phoneme comparison. As an outcome of four alternating learning and test fMRI sessions, participants split into successful learners and non-learners. Relative to non-learners, successful learners showed increased task-related activity in a fronto-parietal network of brain areas encompassing the left lateral premotor cortex as well as bilateral superior and inferior parietal cortices during both learning and rule application. These areas were previously associated with phonological segmentation, phoneme comparison and verbal working memory. Based on these activity patterns and the phonological strategies for rule acquisition and application, we argue that successful learning and processing of complex phonological rules in our paradigm is mediated via a fronto-parietal network for phonological processes.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-07-262016-10-172016-11-08
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2016.00551
PMID: 27877120
PMC: PMC5100555
Other: eCollection 2016
 Degree: -

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Title: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Hum Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 Sequence Number: 551 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5161
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-5161