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  Structural architecture supports functional organization in the human aging brain at a regionwise and network level

Zimmermann, J., Ritter, P., Shen, K., Rothmeier, S., Schirner, M., & McIntosh, A. R. (2016). Structural architecture supports functional organization in the human aging brain at a regionwise and network level. Human Brain Mapping, 37(7), 2645-2661. doi:10.1002/hbm.23200.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-A73F-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1D44-1
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Zimmermann, Joelle1, Author
Ritter, Petra2, 3, 4, 5, Author              
Shen, Kelly1, Author
Rothmeier, Simon2, 3, Author
Schirner, Michael2, Author
McIntosh, Anthony R.1, Author
Affiliations:
1Baycrest Health Sciences, Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, ON, Canada, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Neurology, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Minerva Research Group Brain Modes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_751546              
4Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Aging; Brain connectivity; Structure; Function; Resting-state network
 Abstract: Functional interactions in the brain are constrained by the underlying anatomical architecture, and structural and functional networks share network features such as modularity. Accordingly, age-related changes of structural connectivity (SC) may be paralleled by changes in functional connectivity (FC). We provide a detailed qualitative and quantitative characterization of the SC–FC coupling in human aging as inferred from resting-state blood oxygen-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging in a sample of 47 adults with an age range of 18–82. We revealed that SC and FC decrease with age across most parts of the brain and there is a distinct age-dependency of regionwise SC–FC coupling and network-level SC–FC relations. A specific pattern of SC–FC coupling predicts age more reliably than does regionwise SC or FC alone (r = 0.73, 95% CI = [0.7093, 0.8522]). Hence, our data propose that regionwise SC–FC coupling can be used to characterize brain changes in aging.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-03-182015-08-272016-03-202016-06-132016-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/hbm.23200
PMID: 27041212
Other: Epub 2016
 Degree: -

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Title: Human Brain Mapping
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: New York : Wiley-Liss
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 37 (7) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2645 - 2661 Identifier: ISSN: 1065-9471
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925601686