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  Wettability controls slow immiscible displacement through local interfacial instabilities.

Jung, M., Brinkmann, M., Seemann, R., Hiller, T., Sanchez de la Lama, M., & Herminghaus, S. (2016). Wettability controls slow immiscible displacement through local interfacial instabilities. Physical Review Fluids, 1(7): 074202. doi:10.1103/PhysRevFluids.1.074202.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-B4C5-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-30C6-A
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Jung, Michael1, Author              
Brinkmann, Martin2, Author              
Seemann, Ralf1, Author              
Hiller, Thomas2, Author              
Sanchez de la Lama, Marta2, Author              
Herminghaus, Stephan3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Group Geometry of Fluid Interfaces, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society, ou_2063311              
2Group Theory of wet random assemblies, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society, ou_2063303              
3Group Granular matter and irreversibility, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society, ou_2063306              

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 Abstract: Immiscible fluid displacement with average front velocities in the capillary-dominated regime is studied in a transparent Hele-Shaw cell with cylindrical posts. Employing various combinations of fluids and wall materials allows us to cover a range of advancing contact angles 46◦ θa 180◦ of the invading fluid in our experiments. In parallel, we study the displacement process in particle-based simulations that account for wall wettability. Considering the same arrangement of posts in experiments and simulation, we find a consistent crossover between stable interfacial displacement at θa 80◦ and capillary fingering at high contact angles θa 120◦. The position of the crossover is quantified through the evolution of the interface length and the final saturation of the displaced fluid. A statistical analysis of the local displacement processes demonstrates that the shape evolution of the fluid front is governed by local instabilities as proposed by Cieplak and Robbins for a quasistatic interfacial displacement [Cieplak and Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 2042 (1988)]. The regime of stable front advances coincides with a corresponding region of contact angles where cooperative interfacial instabilities prevail. Capillary fingering, however, is observed only for large θa , where noncooperative instabilities dominate the invasion process.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-11-032016
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.1.074202
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Title: Physical Review Fluids
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: 19 Volume / Issue: 1 (7) Sequence Number: 074202 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -