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  Impact of associative word learning on phonotactic processing in 6-month-old infants: A combined EEG and fNIRS study

Obrig, H., Mock, J., Stephan, F., Richter, M., Vignotto, M., & Rossi, S. (2017). Impact of associative word learning on phonotactic processing in 6-month-old infants: A combined EEG and fNIRS study. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 25, 185-197. doi:10.1016/j.dcn.2016.09.001.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-B767-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1E4F-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Obrig, Hellmuth1, 2, Author              
Mock, Julia2, 3, Author
Stephan, Franziska2, 4, Author
Richter, Maria2, 5, Author
Vignotto, Micol1, Author              
Rossi, Sonja1, 6, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien, Tübingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Institute of Educational Sciences, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Department of Linguistics, University of Potsdam, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Department of Medical Psychology, Innsbruck Medical University, Austria, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: fNIRS; Phonotactics; Associative training; Language development
 Abstract: During early language development native phonotactics are acquired in a ‘bottom-up’ fashion, relying on exquisite auditory differentiation skills operational from birth. Since basic lexico-semantic abilities have been demonstrated from 6 months onwards, ‘top-down’ influences on phonotactic learning may complement the extraction of transitional probabilities in phonotactic learning. Such a bidirectional acquisition strategy predicts, that familiarization with (proto)words should affect processing of untrained word-forms of similar phonological structure. We investigated 6-month-old infants undergoing an associative training to establish a pseudoword-pseudoobject link. Comparison between pre- and post-training responses to trained and untrained items allowed investigating training effects. Additionally phonotactic status (50% legal, 50% illegal with regard to German) allowed investigating influences of previous language experience. EEG and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) provided measures of electrophysiological and hemodynamic responses. We find evidence for a robust effect of associative training on pseudoword processing when presented in isolation. This transferred to untrained items. Previous linguistic experience showed a much weaker effect. Taken together the results suggest that sensitivity to phonotactic contrasts is present at 6 months, but that acceptance as lexical candidates is rapidly modulated when word forms following non-native phonotactics become potentially meaningful due to repeated exposure in a semantic context.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-09-032016-04-202016-09-042016-09-202017-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.dcn.2016.09.001
PMID: 27692617
Other: Epub 2016
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Title: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 25 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 185 - 197 Identifier: ISSN: 1878-9293
CoNE: /journals/resource/1878-9293