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  Patterns of MHC-dependent mate selection in humans and non-human primates: a meta-analysis

Winternitz, J. C., Abbate, J. L., Huchard, E., Havlíček, J., & Garamszegi, L. Z. (2016). Patterns of MHC-dependent mate selection in humans and non-human primates: a meta-analysis. Molecular Ecology, n/a-n/a. doi:10.1111/mec.13920.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-0C4B-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-0C4C-8
Genre: Journal Article

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Winternitz_et_al-2016-Molecular_Ecology.pdf (Preprint), 2MB
 
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Winternitz, J. C.1, Author              
Abbate, J. L., Author
Huchard, E., Author
Havlíček, J., Author
Garamszegi, L. Z., Author
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1Emmy Noether Research Group Evolutionary Immunogenomics, Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_2068286              

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Free keywords: Major Histocompatibility Complex; sexual selection; inbreeding avoidance; mating preference; good genes; HLA
 Abstract: Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in vertebrates are integral for effective adaptive immune response and are associated with sexual selection. Evidence from a range of vertebrates supports MHC-based preference for diverse and dissimilar mating partners, but evidence from human mate choice studies has been disparate and controversial. Methodologies and sampling peculiarities specific to human studies make it difficult to know whether wide discrepancies in results among human populations are real or artifact. To better understand what processes may affect MHC-mediated mate choice across humans and non-human primates we performed phylogenetically controlled meta-analyses using 58 effect sizes from 30 studies across 7 primate species. Primates showed a general trend favoring more MHC-diverse mates, which was statistically significant for humans. In contrast, there was no tendency for MHC-dissimilar mate choice, and for humans, we observed effect sizes indicating selection of both MHC-dissimilar and MHC-similar mates. Focusing on MHC-similar effect sizes only, we found evidence that preference for MHC-similarity was an artifact of population ethnic heterogeneity in observational studies but not among experimental studies with more control over socio-cultural biases. This suggests that human assortative mating biases may be responsible for some patterns of MHC-based mate choice. Additionally, the overall effect sizes of primate MHC-based mating preferences are relatively weak (Fisher's Z correlation coefficient for dissimilarity Zr = 0.044, diversity Zr = 0.153), calling for careful sampling design in future studies. Overall, our results indicate that preference for more MHC diverse mates is significant for humans and likely conserved across primates.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-10-142016-05-182016-10-192016-11-172016
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/mec.13920
BibTex Citekey: MEC:MEC13920
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Title: Molecular Ecology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Blackwell Science
Pages: 41 Seiten Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: n/a - n/a Identifier: ISSN: 0962-1083
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925580119