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  Individual variation in intentionality in the mind-wandering state is reflected in the integration of the default-mode, fronto-parietal, and limbic networks

Golchert, J., Smallwood, J., Jefferies, E., Seli, P., Huntenburg, J. M., Liem, F., et al. (2017). Individual variation in intentionality in the mind-wandering state is reflected in the integration of the default-mode, fronto-parietal, and limbic networks. NeuroImage, 146, 226-235. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.11.025.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-0DF7-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-C7C3-0
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Golchert, Johannes1, Author              
Smallwood, Jonathan2, Author              
Jefferies, Elizabeth2, Author
Seli, Paul3, Author
Huntenburg, Julia M.1, 4, Author              
Liem, Franz2, Author              
Lauckner, Mark1, Author              
Oligschläger, Sabine1, Author              
Bernhardt, Boris5, Author
Villringer, Arno6, 7, Author              
Margulies, Daniel S.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Neuroanatomy and Connectivity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356546              
2Department of Psychology, University of York, Heslington, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA, ou_persistent22              
4Neurocomputation and Neuroimaging Unit, FU Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Brain Imaging Center, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada, ou_persistent22              
6Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
7Center for Stroke Research, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Mind-wandering; Intentionality; Cognitive control; Cortical thickness; Functional connectivity
 Abstract: Mind-wandering has a controversial relationship with cognitive control. Existing psychological evidence supports the hypothesis that episodes of mind-wandering reflect a failure to constrain thinking to task-relevant material, as well the apparently alternative view that control can facilitate the expression of self-generated mental content. We assessed whether this apparent contradiction arises because of a failure to consider differences in the types of thoughts that occur during mind-wandering, and in particular, the associated level of intentionality. Using multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis, we examined the cortical organisation that underlies inter-individual differences in descriptions of the spontaneous or deliberate nature of mind-wandering. Cortical thickness, as well as functional connectivity analyses, implicated regions relevant to cognitive control and regions of the default-mode network for individuals who reported high rates of deliberate mind-wandering. In contrast, higher reports of spontaneous mind-wandering were associated with cortical thinning in parietal and posterior temporal regions in the left hemisphere (which are important in the control of cognition and attention) as well as heightened connectivity between the intraparietal sulcus and a region that spanned limbic and default-mode regions in the ventral inferior frontal gyrus. Finally, we observed a dissociation in the thickness of the retrosplenial cortex / lingual gyrus, with higher reports of spontaneous mind-wandering being associated with thickening in the left hemisphere, and higher repots of deliberate mind-wandering with thinning in the right hemisphere. These results suggest that the intentionality of the mind-wandering state depends on integration between the control and default-mode networks, with more deliberation being associated with greater integration between these systems. We conclude that one reason why mind-wandering has a controversial relationship with control is because it depends on whether the thoughts emerge in a deliberate or spontaneous fashion.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-11-022016-09-282016-11-102016-11-152017-02-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.11.025
PMID: 27864082
Other: Epub 2016
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : BB/J006963/1
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)
Project name : Wedding bells or bedding wells? Lexical and semantic influences on phoneme binding / SEMBIND
Grant ID : 283530
Funding program : Funding Programme 7
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)
Project name : -
Grant ID : P2ZHP1_155200
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Swiss National Science Foundation
Project name : Not all minds that wander are lost: A neurocognitive test of mind-wandering state’s contribution to human cognition / WANDERINGMINDS
Grant ID : 646927
Funding program : Funding Programme 7
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)
Project name : Wandering Minds: Interdisciplinary Experiments on Self-Generated Thought
Grant ID : 89439 ; 89440
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Volkswagen Foundation
Project name : “Prospective Psychology Stage 2: A Research Competition”
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : John Templeton Foundation

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 146 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 226 - 235 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: /journals/resource/954922650166