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  Statistical learning of music- and language-like sequences and tolerance for spectral shifts

Daikoku, T., Yatomi, Y., & Yumoto, M. (2015). Statistical learning of music- and language-like sequences and tolerance for spectral shifts. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 118, 8-19. doi:10.1016/j.nlm.2014.11.001.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-0DC7-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-790E-7
Genre: Journal Article

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Daikoku, Tatsuya1, Author              
Yatomi, Yutaka1, Author
Yumoto, Masato1, Author
Affiliations:
1Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Japan, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Language and music; Statistical learning; Domain generality; Spectral shifts; Markov process; Magnetoencephalography
 Abstract: In our previous study (Daikoku, Yatomi, & Yumoto, 2014), we demonstrated that the N1m response could be a marker for the statistical learning process of pitch sequence, in which each tone was ordered by a Markov stochastic model. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the statistical learning of music- and language-like auditory sequences is reflected in the N1m responses based on the assumption that both language and music share domain generality. By using vowel sounds generated by a formant synthesizer, we devised music- and language-like auditory sequences in which higher-ordered transitional rules were embedded according to a Markov stochastic model by controlling fundamental (F0) and/or formant frequencies (F1–F2). In each sequence, F0 and/or F1–F2 were spectrally shifted in the last one-third of the tone sequence. Neuromagnetic responses to the tone sequences were recorded from 14 right-handed normal volunteers. In the music- and language-like sequences with pitch change, the N1m responses to the tones that appeared with higher transitional probability were significantly decreased compared with the responses to the tones that appeared with lower transitional probability within the first two-thirds of each sequence. Moreover, the amplitude difference was even retained within the last one-third of the sequence after the spectral shifts. However, in the language-like sequence without pitch change, no significant difference could be detected. The pitch change may facilitate the statistical learning in language and music. Statistically acquired knowledge may be appropriated to process altered auditory sequences with spectral shifts. The relative processing of spectral sequences may be a domain-general auditory mechanism that is innate to humans.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-09-252014-01-082014-11-022014-11-082015-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.nlm.2014.11.001
PMID: 25451311
Other: Epub 2014
 Degree: -

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Title: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
  Other : Neurobiol. Learn. Mem.
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 118 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 8 - 19 Identifier: ISSN: 1074-7427
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954926963939