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  Cell-assisted assembly of colloidal crystallites

Kodali, V. K., Roos, W., Spatz, J. P., & Curtis, J. E. (2007). Cell-assisted assembly of colloidal crystallites. Soft Matter, 3, 337-348. doi:10.1039/B611022N.

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Kodali, Vamsi K.1, Author              
Roos, Wouter1, Author              
Spatz, Joachim P.1, 2, Author              
Curtis, Jennifer E.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society, ou_2364731              
2Biophysical Chemistry, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Many cells ingest foreign particles through a process known as phagocytosis. It now turns out that some cell types organize phagocytosed microparticles into crystalline arrays. Much like the classic crystallization of colloidal particles in a thermal bath, crystallization within the cell is driven by the spatial confinement of mutually repelling particles, in this case by the cell membrane. Cytoskeleton-driven motions exert a randomizing force, similar to but stronger than thermal forces; these motions anneal defects and purify the colloidal crystals within the cells. Bidisperse mixtures of microspheres phase separate within the cell, with the larger particles crystallizing around the nucleus and the smaller particles crystallizing around the perimeter of the large particle array. Mitochondria also participate in this kind of size segregation, which appears to be driven by membrane tension and curvature minimization. Beyond the curiosity of the phenomenon itself, cell-assisted colloidal assembly may prove useful as a new tool to study a variety of biophysical processes including cytoskeletal rearrangements, organelle–membrane interactions, the in vivo mechanics of microtubules, the cooperativity of molecular motors and intracellular traffic jams on cytoskeletal filaments.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2006-07-312006-11-032006-11-232007
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 12
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: eDoc: 299071
DOI: 10.1039/B611022N
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Title: Soft Matter
  Abbreviation : Soft Matter
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Cambridge, UK : Royal Society of Chemistry
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 3 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 337 - 348 Identifier: ISSN: 1744-683X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1744-683X