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  Attention and eye movement related activation of neurons in the dorsal prelunate gyrus (area DP).

Li, C. Y., Tanaka, M., & Creutzfeldt, O. D. (1989). Attention and eye movement related activation of neurons in the dorsal prelunate gyrus (area DP). Brain Research, 496(1-2), 307-313. doi:10.1016/0006-8993(89)91078-0.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-2EBB-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-2EBE-C
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Li, C. Y.1, Author              
Tanaka, M.1, Author              
Creutzfeldt, O. D.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Abteilung Neurobiologie, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578620              

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Free keywords: Monkey; Prelunate gyrus; Area DP; Eye movement; Attention
 Abstract: Neurons in area DP, the dorsomedial portion of the prelunate gyrus of awake monkeys (Macaca mulatta and Macaca sylvana, responded only little if at all to stationary or moving light stimuli. Circcumscribed recceptive fields could not be determined in the majority of cells. About 25% of the units became active at a certain gaze position, mostly ipsilateral to the recording site, and with a latency of 70–150 ms after the eye had attained this position with a saccade. About 70% of neurons were activatd vigorously when the monkey looked attentively at an object, such as a face, a glove, a hand or simply towarsd the opening door, and explored it visually. These stimuli elicit attention as well as emotional responses. Photographed objects or faces flashed on a screen produced only little if any response. Our observations, therefore, suggest that the dorsomedial part of the prelunate gyrus may represent activities related to behavioral aspects of vision rather than to features of the visual image itself.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2003-03-071989-09-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/0006-8993(89)91078-0
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Title: Brain Research
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 496 (1-2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 307 - 313 Identifier: -