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  Fine-scale recombination maps of fungal plant pathogens reveal dynamic recombination landscapes and intragenic hotspots

Stukenbrock, E. H., & Dutheil, J. Y. (2018). Fine-scale recombination maps of fungal plant pathogens reveal dynamic recombination landscapes and intragenic hotspots. Genetics, 208(3), 1209-1229. doi:10.1534/genetics.117.300502.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-3AEC-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-B52A-3
Genre: Journal Article

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http://www.genetics.org/content/208/3/1209 (Publisher version)
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Stukenbrock, Eva H.1, Author              
Dutheil, Julien Y.2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Fellow Group Environmental Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_2068284              
2Department Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445635              

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 Abstract: Meiotic recombination is an important driver of evolution. Variability in the intensity of recombination across chromosomes can affect sequence composition, nucleotide variation, and rates of adaptation. In many organisms, recombination events are concentrated within short segments termed recombination hotspots. The variation in recombination rate and positions of recombination hotspot can be studied using population genomics data and statistical methods. In this study, we conducted population genomics analyses to address the evolution of recombination in two closely related fungal plant pathogens: the prominent wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici and a sister species infecting wild grasses Z. ardabiliae. We specifically addressed whether recombination landscapes, including hotspot positions, are conserved in the two recently diverged species and if recombination contributes to rapid evolution of pathogenicity traits. We conducted a detailed simulation analysis to assess the performance of methods of recombination rate estimation based on patterns of linkage disequilibrium, in particular in the context of high nucleotide diversity. Our analyses reveal overall high recombination rates, a lack of suppressed recombination in centromeres, and significantly lower recombination rates on chromosomes that are known to be accessory. The comparison of the recombination landscapes of the two species reveals a strong correlation of recombination rate at the megabase scale, but little correlation at smaller scales. The recombination landscapes in both pathogen species are dominated by frequent recombination hotspots across the genome including coding regions, suggesting a strong impact of recombination on gene evolution. A significant but small fraction of these hotspots colocalize between the two species, suggesting that hotspot dynamics contribute to the overall pattern of fast evolving recombination in these species. © 2018 Stukenbrock and Dutheil.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-11-122017-12-152017-12-202018-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1534/genetics.117.300502
BibTex Citekey: Stukenbrock20181209
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Title: Genetics
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Genetics Society of America
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 208 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1209 - 1229 Identifier: ISSN: 0016-6731
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925400554