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  Auditory brainstem responses to stop consonants predict literacy

Neef, N., Schaadt, G., & Friederici, A. D. (2017). Auditory brainstem responses to stop consonants predict literacy. Clinical Neurophysiology, 128(3), 484-494. doi:10.1016/j.clinph.2016.12.007.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-47A0-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-BB0E-C
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Neef, Nicole1, Author              
Schaadt, Gesa1, 2, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Reading disorder; Phonological awareness; Auditory brainstem responses
 Abstract: Objective: Precise temporal coding of speech plays a pivotal role for sound processing throughout the central auditory system which in turn influences literacy acquisition. The current study tests whether an electrophysiological measure of this precision predicts literacy skills. Methods: Complex auditory brainstem responses were analyzed from 62 native-German speaking children aged 11-13 years. We employed the cross-phaseogram approach to compute the quality of the electrophysiological stimulus contrast [da] and [ba]. Phase shifts were expected to vary with literacy. Results: Receiver operating curves demonstrated a feasible sensitivity and specificity of the electrophysiological measure. A multiple regression analysis resulted in a significant prediction of literacy by delta cross-phase as well as phonological awareness. A further commonality analysis separated a unique variance explained by the physiological measure from a unique variance explained by the behavioral measure, and common effects of both. Conclusions: Despite multicollinearities between literacy, phonological awareness, and subcortical differentiation of stop consonants, a combined assessment of behavior and physiology strongly increases the ability to predict literacy skills. Significance: The strong link between the neurophysiological signature of sound encoding and literacy outcome suggests that the delta cross-phase could indicate the risk of dyslexia and thereby complement subjective psychometric measures for early diagnoses.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-10-242016-08-162016-12-052016-12-072017-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.clinph.2016.12.007
PMID: 28131533
Other: Epub 2016
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Funding organization : Max Planck Society

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Title: Clinical Neurophysiology
  Other : Clin. Neurophysiol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 128 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 484 - 494 Identifier: ISSN: 1388-2457
CoNE: /journals/resource/954926941726