English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Transient medial prefrontal perturbation reduces false memory formation

Berkers, R., van der Linden, M., de Almeida, R. F., Müller, N. C. J., Bovy, L., Dresler, M., et al. (2017). Transient medial prefrontal perturbation reduces false memory formation. Cortex, 88, 42-52. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2016.12.015.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-3FF4-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1A31-9
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Berkers, Ruud1, 2, Author              
van der Linden, Marieke1, Author
de Almeida, Rafael F.1, 3, Author
Müller, Nils C. J.1, Author
Bovy, Leonore1, Author
Dresler, Martin1, Author
Morris, Richard G. M.4, Author
Fernandez, Guillen1, Author
Affiliations:
1Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
2Max Planck Research Group Adaptive Memory, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_2295691              
3Faculty of Medicine, University of Brasilia, Brazil, ou_persistent22              
4Centre for Cognitive and Neural Systems (CCNS), University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Medial prefrontal cortex; Transcranial magnetic stimulation; False memory; Deese-Roediger-McDermott; Recall
 Abstract: Knowledge extracted across previous experiences, or schemas, benefit encoding and retention of congruent information. However, they can also reduce specificity and augment memory for semantically related, but false information. A demonstration of the latter is given by the DeeseeRoedigereMcDermott (DRM) paradigm, where the studying of words that fit a common semantic schema are found to induce false memories for words that are congruent with the given schema, but were not studied. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been ascribed the function of leveraging prior knowledge to influence encoding and retrieval, based on imaging and patient studies. Here, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to transiently perturb ongoing mPFC processing immediately before participants performed the DRM-task. We observed the predicted reduction in false recall of critical lures after mPFC perturbation, compared to two control groups, whereas veridical recall and recognition memory performance remained similar across groups. These data provide initial causal evidence for a role of the mPFC in biasing the assimilation of new memories and their consolidation as a function of prior knowledge.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-11-062016-06-152016-12-192016-12-242017-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2016.12.015
PMID: 28068640
Other: Epub 2016
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Cortex
  Other : Cortex
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 88 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 42 - 52 Identifier: ISSN: 0010-9452
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925393344