English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Printing Peptide Arrays with a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Chip

Löffler, F., Cheng, Y.-C., Muenster, B., Striffler, J., Liu, F. C., Bischoff, F. R., et al. (2013). Printing Peptide Arrays with a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Chip. In Advances in Biochemical Engineering-Biotechnology.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-524A-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-524B-2
Genre: Book Chapter

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Löffler, Felix1, Author              
Cheng, Yun-Chien, Author
Muenster, Bastian, Author
Striffler, Jakob, Author
Liu, Fanny C., Author
Bischoff, F. Ralf, Author
Doersam, Edgar, Author
Breitling, Frank, Author
Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander, Author
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: In this chapter, we discuss the state-of-the-art peptide array technologies, comparing the spot technique, lithographical methods, and microelectronic chip-based approaches. Based on this analysis, we describe a novel peptide array synthesis method with a microelectronic chip printer. By means of a complementary metal oxide semiconductor chip, charged bioparticles can be patterned on its surface. The bioparticles serve as vehicles to transfer molecule monomers to specific synthesis spots. Our chip offers 16,384 pixel electrodes on its surface with a spot-to-spot pitch of 100 mu m. By switching the voltage of each pixel between 0 and 100 V separately, it is possible to generate arbitrary particle patterns for combinatorial molecule synthesis. Afterwards, the patterned chip surface serves as a printing head to transfer the particle pattern from its surface to a synthesis substrate. We conducted a series of proof-of-principle experiments to synthesize high-density peptide arrays. Our solid phase synthesis approach is based on the 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl protection group strategy. After melting the particles, embedded monomers diffuse to the surface and participate in the coupling reaction to the surface. The method demonstrated herein can be easily extended to the synthesis of more complicated artificial molecules by using bioparticles with artificial molecular building blocks. The possibility of synthesizing artificial peptides was also shown in an experiment in which we patterned biotin particles in a high-density array format. These results open the road to the development of peptide-based functional modules for diverse applications in biotechnology.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2013
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: ISI: 000332675300002
DOI: 10.1007/10_2013_202
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Advances in Biochemical Engineering-Biotechnology
Source Genre: Series
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 137 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0724-6145

Source 2

show
hide
Title: Fundamentals and Application of New Bioproduction Systems
Source Genre: Book
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Springer
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1 - 23 Identifier: -