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  Hydroxyl radicals from secondary organic aerosol decomposition in water

Tong, H., Arangio, A. M., Lakey, P. S. J., Berkemeier, T., Liu, F., Kampf, C. J., et al. (2016). Hydroxyl radicals from secondary organic aerosol decomposition in water. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 16(3), 1761-1771. doi:10.5194/acp-16-1761-2016.

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 Creators:
Tong, H.1, Author              
Arangio, Andrea M.1, Author              
Lakey, Pascale S. J.1, Author              
Berkemeier, T.1, Author              
Liu, Fobang1, Author              
Kampf, Christopher J.1, Author              
Brune, W. H.2, Author
Pöschl, U.1, Author              
Shiraiwa, M.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1826290              
2external, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: We found that ambient and laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA) form substantial amounts of OH radicals upon interaction with liquid water, which can be explained by the decomposition of organic hydroperoxides. The molar OH yield from SOA formed by ozonolysis of terpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, limonene) is similar to 0.1% upon extraction with pure water and increases to similar to 1.5% in the presence of Fe2+ ions due to Fenton-like reactions. Upon extraction of SOA samples from OH photooxidation of isoprene, we also detected OH yields of around similar to 0.1 %, which increases upon addition of Fe2+. Our findings imply that the chemical reactivity and aging of SOA particles is strongly enhanced upon interaction with water and iron. In cloud droplets under dark conditions, SOA decomposition can compete with the classical H2O2 Fenton reaction as the source of OH radicals. Also in the human respiratory tract, the inhalation and deposition of SOA particles may lead to a substantial release of OH radicals, which may contribute to oxidative stress and play an important role in the adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosols.

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 Dates: 2016-02-152016
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: We found that ambient and laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA) form substantial amounts of OH radicals upon interaction with liquid water, which can be explained by the decomposition of organic hydroperoxides. The molar OH yield from SOA formed by ozonolysis of terpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene) is  ∼  0.1 % upon extraction with pure water and increases to  ∼  1.5 % in the presence of Fe2+ ions due to Fenton-like reactions. Upon extraction of SOA samples from OH photooxidation of isoprene, we also detected OH yields of around  ∼  0.1 %, which increases upon addition of Fe2+. Our findings imply that the chemical reactivity and aging of SOA particles is strongly enhanced upon interaction with water and iron. In cloud droplets under dark conditions, SOA decomposition can compete with the classical H2O2 Fenton reaction as the source of OH radicals. Also in the human respiratory tract, the inhalation and deposition of SOA particles may lead to a substantial release of OH radicals, which may contribute to oxidative stress and play an important role in the adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosols.
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: ISI: 000371284100034
DOI: 10.5194/acp-16-1761-2016
 Degree: -

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Title: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany : European Geosciences Union
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 16 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1761 - 1771 Identifier: ISSN: 1680-7316
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/111030403014016