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  Variation in the molecular clock of primates

Moorjani, P., Amorim, C. E., Arndt, P. F., & Przeworski, M. (2016). Variation in the molecular clock of primates. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 113(38), 10607-10612. doi:10.1073/pnas.1600374113.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-4735-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-4736-2
Genre: Journal Article

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© 2016 The Author(s)

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 Creators:
Moorjani, P., Author
Amorim, C. E., Author
Arndt, P. F.1, Author              
Przeworski, M., Author
Affiliations:
1Evolutionary Genomics (Peter Arndt), Dept. of Computational Molecular Biology (Head: Martin Vingron), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1479638              

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Free keywords: CpG transition rate human-ape divergence time molecular clock mutation rate primate evolution
 Abstract: Events in primate evolution are often dated by assuming a constant rate of substitution per unit time, but the validity of this assumption remains unclear. Among mammals, it is well known that there exists substantial variation in yearly substitution rates. Such variation is to be expected from differences in life history traits, suggesting it should also be found among primates. Motivated by these considerations, we analyze whole genomes from 10 primate species, including Old World Monkeys (OWMs), New World Monkeys (NWMs), and apes, focusing on putatively neutral autosomal sites and controlling for possible effects of biased gene conversion and methylation at CpG sites. We find that substitution rates are up to 64% higher in lineages leading from the hominoid-NWM ancestor to NWMs than to apes. Within apes, rates are approximately 2% higher in chimpanzees and approximately 7% higher in the gorilla than in humans. Substitution types subject to biased gene conversion show no more variation among species than those not subject to it. Not all mutation types behave similarly, however; in particular, transitions at CpG sites exhibit a more clocklike behavior than do other types, presumably because of their nonreplicative origin. Thus, not only the total rate, but also the mutational spectrum, varies among primates. This finding suggests that events in primate evolution are most reliably dated using CpG transitions. Taking this approach, we estimate the human and chimpanzee divergence time is 12.1 million years, and the human and gorilla divergence time is 15.1 million years.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-09-062016-09-20
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 6
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: PMID: 27601674
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1600374113
ISSN: 1091-6490 (Electronic)0027-8424 (Print)
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Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  Other : Proc. Acad. Sci. USA
  Abbreviation : PNAS
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Washington, D.C. : National Academy of Sciences
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 113 (38) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 10607 - 10612 Identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925427230