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  Analysis of the NK2 homeobox gene ceh-24 reveals sublateral motor neuron control of left-right turning during sleep.

Schwarz, J., & Bringmann, H. (2017). Analysis of the NK2 homeobox gene ceh-24 reveals sublateral motor neuron control of left-right turning during sleep. eLife, 6: e24846. doi:10.7554/eLife.24846.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-E9F5-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-0925-B
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Schwarz, J.1, Author              
Bringmann, H.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group of Sleep and Waking, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578607              

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 Abstract: Sleep is a behavior that is found in all animals that have a nervous system and that have been studied carefully. In Caenorhabditis elegans larvae, sleep is associated with a turning behavior, called flipping, in which animals rotate 180{degree sign} about their longitudinal axis. However, the molecular and neural substrates of this enigmatic behavior are not known. Here, we identified the conserved NK-2 homeobox gene ceh-24 to be crucially required for flipping. ceh-24 is required for the formation of processes and for cholinergic function of sublateral motor neurons, which separately innervate the four body muscle quadrants. Knockdown of cholinergic function in a subset of these sublateral neurons, the SIAs, abolishes flipping. The SIAs depolarize during flipping and their optogenetic activation induces flipping in a fraction of events. Thus, we identified the sublateral SIA neurons to control the three-dimensional movements of flipping. These neurons may also control other types of motion.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-02-28
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.7554/eLife.24846
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Title: eLife
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: 25 Volume / Issue: 6 Sequence Number: e24846 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -