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  Communicative-pragmatic assessment is sensitive and time-effective in measuring the outcome of aphasia therapy

Stahl, B., Mohr, B., Dreyer, F. R., Lucchese, G., & Pulvermüller, F. (2017). Communicative-pragmatic assessment is sensitive and time-effective in measuring the outcome of aphasia therapy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 11: 223. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2017.00223.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-1C87-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-4F02-1
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Stahl, Benjamin1, 2, 3, Author              
Mohr, Bettina4, Author
Dreyer, Felix R.3, Author
Lucchese, Guglielmo3, Author
Pulvermüller, Friedemann3, 5, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Neurology, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neurophysics (Weiskopf), MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_2205649              
3Department of Philosophy and Humanities, FU Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department Psychiatry, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: aphasia; Intensive Language-Action Therapy (ILAT); Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy (CIAT); communicative-pragmatic speech-language testing; neuroscience of pragmatics; formulaic language
 Abstract: A range of methods in clinical research aim to assess treatment-induced progress in aphasia therapy. Here, we used a crossover randomized controlled design to compare the suitability of utterance-centered and dialogue-sensitive outcome measures in speech-language testing. Fourteen individuals with post-stroke chronic non-fluent aphasia each received two types of intensive training in counterbalanced order: conventional confrontation naming, and communicative-pragmatic speech-language therapy (Intensive Language-Action Therapy, an expanded version of Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy). Motivated by linguistic-pragmatic theory and neuroscience data, our dependent variables included a newly created diagnostic instrument, the Action Communication Test (ACT). This diagnostic instrument requires patients to produce target words in two conditions: (i) utterance-centered object naming, and (ii) communicative-pragmatic social interaction based on verbal requests. In addition, we administered a standardized aphasia test battery, the Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT). Composite scores on the ACT and the AAT revealed similar patterns of changes in language performance over time, irrespective of the treatment applied. Changes in language performance were relatively consistent with the AAT results also when considering both ACT subscales separately from each other. However, only the ACT subscale evaluating verbal requests proved to be successful in distinguishing between different types of training in our patient sample. Critically, testing duration was substantially shorter for the entire ACT (10–20 minutes) than for the AAT (60–90 minutes). Taken together, the current findings suggest that communicative-pragmatic methods in speech-language testing provide a sensitive and time-effective measure to determine the outcome of aphasia therapy.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-01-172017-04-182017-05-19
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2017.00223
PMID: 28579951
PMC: PMC5437145
Other: eCollection 2017
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Project name : -
Grant ID : PU 97/15-1
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)
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Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst

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Title: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Hum Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 Sequence Number: 223 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5161
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-5161