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  Abstraction and the (misnamed) language familiarity effect

Johnson, E. K., Bruggeman, L., & Cutler, A. (2018). Abstraction and the (misnamed) language familiarity effect. Cognitive Science, 42, 633-645. doi:10.1111/cogs.12520.

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Johnson, E. K.1, Author
Bruggeman, Laurence2, 3, Author
Cutler, Anne4, 5, 6, Author           
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University, North Ryde, Australia, ou_persistent22              
3ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, ou_persistent22              
4Emeriti, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, ou_2344699              
5The MARCS Institute, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia, ou_persistent22              
6ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Talkers are recognized more accurately if they are speaking the listeners’ native language rather than an unfamiliar language. This “language familiarity effect” has been shown not to depend upon comprehension and must instead involve language sound patterns. We further examine the level of sound-pattern processing involved, by comparing talker recognition in foreign languages versus two varieties of English, by (a) English speakers of one variety, (b) English speakers of the other variety, and (c) non-native listeners (more familiar with one of the varieties). All listener groups performed better with native than foreign speech, but no effect of language variety appeared: Native listeners discriminated talkers equally well in each, with the native variety never outdoing the other variety, and non-native listeners discriminated talkers equally poorly in each, irrespective of the variety's familiarity. The results suggest that this talker recognition effect rests not on simple familiarity, but on an abstract level of phonological processing

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 201720172018
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/cogs.12520
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Title: Cognitive Science
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 42 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 633 - 645 Identifier: ISSN: 0364-0213
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925523741